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Our Reese Family & Many Other Genealogy Pages Jewell Keeling

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Matches 101 to 150 of 974

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101 !RELATIVE: IRENE PEVELER is descendant & contributed lots of data. HOUSE, JAMES HIRAM (I222)
 
102 !RELATIVE: IRENE PEVELER, EVELYN WATSON, MAXINE FORESTER, KARL HOUSE, & ODENIAH
REESE are descendants & contributed most of data.

!CENSUS: Have 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860.

!LINK: Need to prove this Jacob is the father of our Joseph. 
HOUSE, JACOB (I183)
 
103 !RELATIVE: IRENE PEVELER, KARL HOUSE, SUSIE COOPER, RUBY SCOTT, & BERT BARKER
are descendants & have contributed most of data.

!CENSUS: Have 1787, 1810, 1820. There is no 1800 VA census. 
HOUSE, MATTHIAS (I153)
 
104 !RELATIVE: KARL HOUSE & IRENE PEVELER are descendants & contributed a lot of
the data. SHERWOOD RAY REESE & ODENIAH REESE gave a lot of information before
they died.

!DEATH: It is believed Joseph died on his way back from visiting his son in
Texas.

!CENSUS: Have 1830, 1840, 1850. Children's named & birthdates are taken from
the 1850 census.

Chronology by June Ann Reese. The numbers represent documents

JOSEF HOUSE CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1815 Born Germany
1833 Nancy was born (18) Tennessee
1834 Son Issac was born (19) Missouri
1836 Son John was born (21) Missouri
1837 Daughter Elizabeth was born (22) Missouri
1839 Son Richard was born 24) Missouri
1840 Census (25) Riptey Co,Mo.
1841 Son James was born (29) Missouri
1844 Son Marion was born (29) Missouri
1846 Daughter Miary was born (31) Missouri
Apr 1850 Daughter Catherine was born (35) Texas Co, Mo.
21 Nov 1850 Census (35) Texas Co, Mo.
8 May 1855 Deed to Eli Wood (40) Texas Co, Mo

12 July 1856 Son John married (41) Texas Co, Mo.
Daughter Mary Ann married Howell Co, Mo
24 Dec.1868 Son R:ichard married (53) Texas Co. Mo. 
HOUSE, JOSEPH (I191)
 
105 !RELATIVE: KARL HOUSE is descendant & gave Family Group Sheets. HOUSE, ISAAC (I218)
 
106 !RELATIVE: Most data from descendant DOUG BRADSHAW.

!MARRIAGE: Recorded in Book 3, pg 147 Fauquier Co.

!DEATH: Will probated Apr 23, 1866 in Fauquier Co.

!CENSUS: Have 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850.

!LINK: Named in Dad's Will. 
WIGFIELD, JOHN JOHNSON (I115)
 
107 !RELATIVE: Most data from descendants IRENE PEVELER, BERT BARKER & RUBY SCOTT.

!CENSUS: Have 1830, 1840, 1850. 
HOUSE, ADAM (I154)
 
108 !RELATIVE: Most of this data is from Sherwood Ray Reese, Odeniah Reese, Irene
Peveler, Georgia Fletcher & Pat Smith.

!HONORS: Believed to have been very active in Illinois government.

!RELIGION: Listed as UB Clergyman on census. Recorded marriages he performed.
Founder of Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church.

!CENSUS: Have 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860.

Elijah Reese Jr. and Martha (Nancy) Calendar of Events. See the marriage notes for story. (Prepared by June Ann Reese)

1802-1804 Elijah Jr. was born (I'm using 1803) TN/SC
1803-1806 Martha was born (I'm using 1805) NC
1810 Elijah Jr on his dad's Census(7) Penaleton Dist, NC
1820-1835 One half of the people a of SC moved
west out of the state mainly to middle TN.
1823-1824 Daughter Becka was born (20-18)
24 Oct 1825 Son Benjamin Franklin was born(22-20) Morgan Co, TN
11 Sept 1826 Mentioned in Fathers deed (23) Emory River, Morgan Co,TN
10 Oct/15 Nov 1828 Entered land on records Morgan Co, TN
1826-1828 Daughter was born
1827 Start of big Irish and German immigration to U.S.
15 July 1829 Son William C. born (26-24) TN
early 1830's Heavy immigration to Illinois began
1830 Census (27-25) Fayette Co, IL
1830 Son George was born (27-25) IL
18 Aug 1832 Candidate for Justice of the Peace (29)Fayette Co,IL
1833 daughter Mary Jane was born (33 - 331) IL
1835 State Census (32) Fayette Co, IL
1836 Son John (Red) was born. (33-31) IL
5/22 Nov 1836 Filed 2 patent deeds (33) Fayette Co, IL
Sep 1836 Sold 25 acres of land in Morgan Co, TN(?) on the west fork of Emory River to Charles Galloway for $85
1838 Daughter Sally A (Dolly) was born (36-3l) IL
6 Aug 1838 Candidate for County Commission (35) Fayette Co, IL
29 Jan 1840 Son Sherwood was born (36-34) Vandalia, Fayette Co, IL
1840 Census (37-35 ) Vandalia, Fayette Co, IL
3 Aug 1840 Candidate for County Commissioner (39) Fayette Co, IL
27 Aug 1842 Resigned as County Commissioner IL
1842 Sarah was born (39-37) IL
1843 Commissioner to locate state road(40) Fayette Co. IL
1846 Representative in Special Election(43) Fayette Co, IL
3 June 1846 Son Benjamin F. Enlisted(43) Vandalia Co, IL
30 Dec 1846 Candidate for Senator(43) Fayette Co, IL
19 Apr 1847 Candidate as Delegate to Constitutional Convention
2 Sept 1847 Son Benjamin married (44-42) Fayette Co, IL
1847 Dallas, James R, and Shields was born(44-42) IL
1848 granddaughter Nannie(Mary Janes) was born (45-43) MO
1848 grandson James (Benjamin F) was born (45-43) MO
12 July 1848 Deed from Gibberson (45) Massac Co, IL
1850 Ruth was born (47-45) IL
27 Sept 1850 Census (46-44 as per Census) Massac Co, IL
1855 Granddaughter Sadie Taylor (Mary Jane's) was born (54-52)
8 July 1855 Son William married (52-50) Fayette Co, IL
1857 Grandson Bent Tay1or (Mary Jane's) was born (54-52 )
13 Aug 1857 Son John married (54-52 ) Fayette Co, IL
1857 Founding member of Mt. Pisgah Baptist in Hutton Valley, MO
Howell Co, MO
1858 Grandson Add (William's) was born (55-53) IL
Dec 1859 Granddaughter Adna (Mary Jane's) was born (56-54) MO
12 July 1860 Census (58-57-as per Census) Willowsprings, Howell Co, MO
1861-1865 Civil War
1866 Grandson William Terrip (Dr. Sherwood's ) was born (63-61)
3 July 1867 Deed to Hood(64-62) Howell Co, MO
Sept 1867 Grandson John Muck (Dr. Sherwood's) was born (64-62) IL
1 Jan 1868 Deed to Selph (65-63) Howell Co, MO
30 Oct 1868 Recorded 2 marriages he performed (65) Howell Co, MO

In 1837 Illinois decided to move the state capitol to Springfield from Vandalia. The house of Representatives first met in the new caitol in Springfield in 1840. Family tradition says Elijah was unhappy with Lincoln when the capitol was moved and decided to relocate in Massac Co, IL. He owned some town lots in Metropolis City. He formed a Reese Land Company along with his brothers (Odeniah says there were 4 brothers), Sherwaood Ray Reese said 2 of the brothers came from New York. Odeniah says Elijay sailed on a boat down the Mississippi into Arkansas and then followed the tributaries to the "Old Willow Springs" area of Missouri.

Had peg leg. Son-in-law, Jim Sims, shot his leg off. Elijah then shot Jim's arm off. Seem Jim would get his wife pregnant, leave her with Elijah, and not return until after the baby was born. (per Virgie Smith). June Ann Reese was told by Sherwwood Ray Reese that the daughter was Jane and husband was "Bent" Taylor, a travelling gambler and member of KKK. Often when Taylor was gone, Elijah would bring Jane and the children to her parent's house, he stormed at Elijah and shot him in the leg, which susbsequently had to be removed. He was later hung in AR for the murder of his best friend, Riley Black. At a later date, someone else confessed to the murder.

After 1868 at Rowe Cem (no Marker), Hutton Valley, MO (located on highway 60 about 200 yards East of State Rd RA on North side of the road. Hard to see from highway, Elijah, Jr. owned this property until Jan 1867 when he sold it to Lorenzo Hood for $900. It was resold to Administrator of Hood's estate, Pleasant N Gulley. I (Patricia M Reese) believe Gullye's still owns the property. 
Reese, Elijah Jr. (I4969)
 
109 !RELATIVE: NANCY BARRON is descendant & contributed data & Family Group Sheet. HOUSE, ADAM JR. (I186)
 
110 !RELATIVE: RUBY SCOTT is descendant.

!FGS: Have Family Group Sheet. 
HOUSE, JACOB (I160)
 
111 !RELATIVE: STEPHANIE FITZPATRICK is descendant & contributor. ROBINSON, JOSEPH (I138)
 
112 !Very active in Poetry-camp ground community.
1868-1894 was a messenger and clerk in Salem Baptist Church.
Was a postmaster with his daughter Maggie in 1870s. Farmer.
In 1880 Census, Sarah, age 82 (his mother) living with him. 
Reese, Francis Jefferson (I3420)
 
113 "'THE first settlement in what is now Howell County, was made in 1838, in Howell Valley, on the present site of West Plains. This county was organized in 1857 from parts of Oregon and Ozark Counties.' (Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 255.) On the 6th of June of the same year the Mt Pisgah Church (the first effective institution of the kind in the county) was organized by Elds. W.P. Freeman, James Hill and Elijah Reese, on 8 members. In the fall of 1857 the church joined RICHLAND ASSOCIATION; this body was formed prior to the organization of Howell County, embraced in its territory parts of Carter and Oregon Counties." Reese, Elijah Jr. (I4969)
 
114 "Born in Overton County Tennessee in 1938, he came to Texas in 1851 with his fa mily from Arkansas, where they had lived since 1850. He married first Charlotte Williams, who died before 1874. He married second Mariah W. Johnson on 1 Janua ry 1874 in Burnet. He enlisted in Company G, 17th Texas Infantry, at Camp Terry , Travis County, in the Spring of 1862, serving until the end of the war. On hi s pension application he stated he "got home in June 1865." He owned a share of a small grocery business in Briggs, whose stock was described as "staple and f ancy groceries." He wrote an inventory of his "worldly goods" on the store's le tterhead, which included "1 small residence, on 1 acre of land cost me $450.00. " He was 74 years old when he applied for a Confederate pension, which was appr oved in 1912. He died in March 1915. His wife, Mariah, applied for a widow's pe nsion in April 1915, which she dre until her death in June 1935. Both are burie d at Mahomet. Sources: Pension file from Texas State Archives, Burnet County Hi story, Vol II, p. 304 and Burnet County Cemetery Records, 1852-1982."

From h ttp://www.rootsweb.com/~txburnet/cwsketch.html

"[392] BIOGRAPHY: Served in t he Confederate Army during the War Between the States.

"CENSUS: Christopher Columbus Stewart is listed in the 1860 of Burnet Co. Texas.
C.C. Stewart, 22 years old, farmer, born in Tennessee.
Charlota, 23 year old, born in Arkansa s
John T., 1 month old, born in Texas.
Christopher Columbus Stewart is also listed in the 1870, and 1880 Census of Burnet Co., Texas. Researcher: Joyce Li ndstrom.

"!MARRIAGE: C.C. Stewart Married Charlotte Williams, 15 Jul 1858, in Burnet County, Texas. Source: Burnet County Marriage REcords, Book A., 1852- 1868, O-Y, page 127. Researcher: Georgenia Stewart, 22 March 2000."

From htt p://www.stewartkin.com 
Stewart, Christopher Columbus Sr. (I4622)
 
115 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Burnett, G.R. (I3175)
 
116 "Coalgate Courier" October 17, 1918
SAM POWELL IS DEADSam Powell, 65, residing out 12 miles west of town, dropped dead in his chair Wednesday of heart failure. Mr. Powell has resided in or around Coalgate for 20 years, and is well known by a large number of our people. His remains will be laid to rest this (Thursday) afternoon. 
Powell, Samuel Warren (I6360)
 
117 "Elzabeth Worley Hatley outlived her husband, Green Wesley Hatley, ten years, d ying December 8, 1890. They are both buried in the Hatley Cemetery on their own land. Their oldest son, John Worley Hatley is buried there also, along with fo urteen others. Some are grandchildren of Green and Elizabeth. Another is the wi fe of their grandson, John Worley Hatley, Mary Arminta Anderson Hatley. The oth ers are unknown.

"In her Will Elizabeth Worley Hatley Left to her two younge st sons, A.W. and S.A. Hatley "jointly the one undivided one half of the Green Hatley 160 acres survey and the J.W. (? John Worley) Hatley 160 survey both tra cts of land being located on Lucy Creek and being occupied by me as a homestead ." To her youngest son S.A. Hatley "all my household furniture, beds, bedding, wearing apparel and in consideration my said son S.A. Hatley to remain with me and support me during the remainder of my natural life.

"At the time of her death Elizabeth Hatley's personal property was listed, besides the land, as:
o ne horse value $25.00
11 head of stock cattle 55.00
household & kitchen furniture 60.00
135 more or less bushels of corn 70.00
90 bushels of cotton seed 22.50

"It is believed that both sons did r emain close to her until her death."

From the notes of Rose Ann Newby Westfa ll, Somerville, TX. 
Worley, Elizabeth (I4656)
 
118 "Green Wesley Hatley was born June 26, 1811 probably in Chatham County, North C arolina. He was the eldest son of Mark and Delilah Buchanan Hatley. It is not k nown exactly when his family moved from North Carolina, but they were in Hardin County, Tennessee by 1818 when their son Sherrod was born.

"On January 31, 1832 Green Wesley Hatley took as his bride Elizabeth Worley, daughter of John W orley. Elizabeth was a full blood Cherokee Indian. R.W. (Son) Hatley who lives in Lampasas, Texas (1988) is a great grandson of Green and Elizabeth. Son is no w 82 years old and he remembers hearing his daddy, John Worley Hatley (1868-193 7) say he had an uncle John Worley, who lived on an Indian Reservation in Oklah oma, say if he would go to Oklahoma with him he would make him rich. This Uncle Johm Worley was a brother of Elizabeth Worley Hatley.

"Sometimes between 18 50 and 1852, Green and Elizabeth moved their family from Tennessee to Texas, se ttling in Lampasas County. They had two tracts of land in 1880, located on Lucy Creek between what is now Adamsville and Lampasas, probably about four to five miles north-northwest of the city of Lampasas.

"Green and Elizabeth raised their children and lived there until they died. On the 1880 census of Lampasas County, Green is liasted as "maimed, crippled, bedridden or other disability." He was also listed as a farmer. He died June 14, 1880."

From the notes of Ro se Ann Newby Westfall, Somerville, TX. 
Hatley, Green Wesley (I4655)
 
119 "John Worley Hatley, eldest son of Green Wesley Hatley and Elizabeth Worley Hat ley, was born in January of 1834 in Hardin County, Tennessee. On December 12, 1 861, he married Deida M. Smart Van Winkle, who was born on April 22, 1842, in M issouri. John Worley Hatley served in the Confederate Services from September 1 861 until May of 1864. He was with the Texas Rangers before the Civil War and w ith the State Troops during the war. He is the Pvt. John Worley listed in the T exas State Archives on the Ranger Muster Roll as a Minuteman, Lampasas County, Texas. His place of birth is listed as Lampasas County, Texas, which is incorre ct as he was born in Tennessee. He was an active Indian Scout for Lampasas Coun ty at the time of his death. He returned from scouting late one evening, compla ining of a "toe ache" and died the next morning, probably in December of 1867, at the age of 33. He is buried in the Old Hatley Cemetary in Lampasas County, T exas.

"John Worley Hatley and Deida Van Winkle Hatley had three children: Al ice, born 23 September 1862 in Lampasas County, Texas, married Christopher Colu mbus "Lum" Stewart Jr. on July 10, 1882. They had seven children. Alice is buri ed at Mahomet Cemetery in Burnet County, Texas. Green Thomas "Brite" Hatley, bo rn January 22, 1866 in Lampasas County, Texas married Louisa Clementine Guinaty on August 27, 1887 in Lampasas. They had five children. G.T. and Lou are both buried in the Aspermont City Cemetery in Stonewall County, Texas. John Worley H atley was born February 23, 1868, three months after the death of his father, w hich exlpains why he was not a Junior. He married Mary Arminta "Mintie" Anderso n, half sister to Lou Guinaty wife of G.T. Hatley, on March 15, 1894. They had five children. Mintie died at the age of 25, on April 21, 1902. On November 29, 1903 John married Flora Lenora McDonald. They had a daughter and son. John Worl ey Hatley died on November 30, 1937, at the age of 69. He and Flora are buried in the Center Cemetery, near Lometa, in Lampasas County, Texas.

"Deida was r emarried to a neighbor widower, Robert Parker, who was born in Alabama, c/1842. Robert was a farmer with a son, Cicero John, born c/1864, and a daughter, Mary Alma, born c/1866.

"Deida and Robert Parker had six more children: Richard Washington (Wash), Leona, Sophronia, Robert Zachariah (Zack), Arizonia and Leth a. They moved to Weed, Otero County, New Mexico, in 1892. She died there about 1921.

"Deida's brother John Van Winkle married John Worley Hatley's sister R ebecca Hatley. They moved to New Mexico, also, probably about or at the same ti me Robert and Deida moved.

"John Worley Hatley's mother, Elizabeth Worley, w as a full blood Cherokee Indian. It is said by some family members that her bro ther, John Worley, lived on a Indian Reservation in Oklahoma. This has not been researched yet. Indian features are still evident in the present generation."

From the notes of Rose Ann Newby Westfall, Somerville, TX. 
Hatley, John Worley (I4647)
 
120 "Lena Stewart came into this world March 28, 1915 in Hamlin, Texas. She was th e second of seven children, five of whom survived to adulthood. Lena spent seve ral years as an only child after her older sister and first brother died. As ti me passed and more children were born, Lena helped her mother care for and rais e her younger siblings. She often spoke of her sisters and brother almost as if they were her own children, with the fond memories of the good things as well as the exasperating moments that parents remember of childhood.

"Along wit h thousands of others, the Stewart family moved to California from Texas during the Great Depression. Lena pitched in, always doing her share to help ease the financial burden for the large family. She worked in the packing houses of th e large fruit companies, packing oranges and olives. She spent her money not on ly on necessities for her brother and sisters, but for what many at the time co nsidered a luxury--new furniture for the family home.

"During her time off, Lena spent time doing what most young people did--enjoying the company of her f riends. She ran around with her girl friend Roxy Reese regularly, and Roxy int roduced her to her brother, Carthel. They found they had much in common--so mu ch so that they were married September 16, 1935, when Lena was twenty. Their s on, Larry, was born November 17, 1936. Their marriage was a short one, however. Carthel died November 10, 1941, leaving Lena to raise their son alone.

"Le na was a product of her day as well as being ahead of her times in many respect s. She was a patriot in every sense of the word. During World War II, she help ed build war planes to win the war. She was justifiably proud that she had don e her part to keep the world safe from Hitler and his ilk. As a widow, she wor ked full time, sometimes more so, not just to put food on the table, but to bet ter herself as well. She attended talioring and design classes and did alterati ons at home to bring in extra money. This fostered a life-long love for sewing and other handicrafts which she continued until just a few months before her de ath. It also blossomed into a business decades down the road, when she owned h er own fabric shops.

"As a widow, Lena was extremely busy, but not too busy to notice a handsome man, Ed Launder, where she worked at Standard Oil. She de cided he would make Larry a good father and the couple was married November 23, 1945, just after Larry's ninth birthday. Ed later adopted Larry, changing Lar ry's last name from Reese to Launder. Lena and Ed never had any children, but E d loved Larry as if he were his own biological child.

"Lena and Ed owned an orange and avacado grove in Yorba Linda , California . In later years, she often would remark that the fruit she saw in the stores were nothing like the ones they shipped out; she considered them equal to the cull oranges and avaca does they would throw away.

"During the mid 1950's, Larry met and ulitmatel y married the love of his life, Marilyn Bleininger. Lena often remarked on wha t a wonderful daughter-in-law she had been blessed with and she was thrilled wh en, in 1960, Larry and Marilyn had a son named Michael. A daughter, Julie, joi ned the picture two years later and Lena's family was complete for nearly twent y years until Mike and Julie were old enough for families of their own.

"Th e Launders moved from Yorba Linda to Borrego Springs in thge late 1960's. Lena loved the desert and everything about it. This was to be Ed's final home howeve r. He succumbed to cancer in 1975, leaving Lena a widow once again. She never remarried, preferring to travel worldwide, visitng such diverse areas as the Ho ly land and China. She also traveled closer to home, touring the deep South's antebellum homes and sailing down the Mississippi River on a paddle wheeler. Sh e never tired of telling of the places she'd been, and one of her greatest thri lls was being able to walk on the Great Wall of Ch 
Stewart, Lena Rivers (I4552)
 
121 "Listed as "V. May". Reese, Violet Mae (I5172)
 
122 "Louise Bleininger was born August 3, 1904 in Los Nietos, Calif. She had 5 brot hers and 2 sisters. She grew up in a small oilfield lease house in Olinda. She went to grade school in Olinda and high school at Fullerton High School. She al so went a few years at Fullerton Jr. College. Her only work experience was for a short time at Brea-Olinda High School. Most of her life was spent in Olinda e xcept for 2 short moves back to Logansport, Indiana where her parents were orig inally from. Her family settled back in Olinda. Louise used to ride the cable c ar from Rose Drive to Los Angeles with her mother and her sisters, Jane and Kat e. She met Bud through her brother and married on January 4, 1929. Except for a few years during the depression, Bud and Louise lived in a lease house in Olin da.

"They had two children, Ron and Marilyn. Louise was a loving, caring mot her. When Marilyn was ready to go into high school, Louise packed up the house and told Bud that they were moving into town--Brea. This was a major decision, as their rent on their oilfield house, with all utilities included, was $27.00 a month. Louise was 55 when she decided she needed her drivers license. She wou ld walk 4 blocks to Brea Blvd. to catch the city bus to Fullerton Jr. College i n the evening to attend her driving class. After she received her license to dr ive she became very active in the community. She joined the Republican Womans C lub, the Brea Book Club and took ceramic lessons. She made beautiful ceramic pi eces and gave all of the family holiday and house decorations which we will alw ays treasure.

"In her 70's she started driving senior citizens to the grocer y stores, and helped deliver Meals On Wheels. She continued to drive until she was 90, at which time the DMV wouldn't pass her on her driving test because she wouldn't go 50 MPH on Imperial. The DMV told her that if she took driving less ons she could retake her test, but she always said there was nothing wrong with her driving and wouldn't take the lessons.

"One of Louise's favorite events was the Olinda old timers picnic each year at the Carbon Canyon Regional Park. She won awards for being the oldest "girl" and having the most family present. Louise loved her family very much. She was very close to her grandchildren, an d great-grandchildren, she never forgot a birthday, anniversary or special occa sion for each of them."

Composed from biographical sketches by Ron Bleininge r and Paula (Bleininger) Lusk 
Cullen, Gertrude Louise (I4555)
 
123 "Minnie E."? Cullen, Eunice (I5098)
 
124 "Morgan County (formed from Roane county in 1817 and named for General Daniel Morgan): Perhaps the earliest settler was Samuel Hall, who located in 1807 about seven miles northeast of Wartburg. Other pioneers were Martin Hall, Joseph, Benjamin, Michael and Ezra Stonecipher, John M. Staples, Elijah Reese, Titus England, John Freels, Royal Price, William Shoemaker, Mathias Williams, Ephraim Davis, Morgan Hendricks, John Webb, Littleburg Brient, Lewis Rector, John Craig and Basil Human." Reese, Elijah Sr. (I1)
 
125 "rotary helper n: a worker on a drilling or workover rig, subordinate to the driller, whose primary work station is on the rig floor. Sometimes called floorhand, floorman, rig crew member, or roughneck."

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/oilandgas/glossary_of_terms/glossary_of_terms_r.html 
Cullen, Lawrence (I4609)
 
126 "Thomas H. Benton Van Winkle and Elizabeth White (Smart) Van Winkle moved from Missouri, crossing the Red River into Texas 1 December 1851 and arrived in Will iamson County before Christmas, in a train of sixteen wagons of relatives and f riends.

"Unfortunately we are not able at this time to make a definite conne ction with earlier generations and our Thomas Van Winkle. We know he was probab ly born in North Carolina about 1805. It is not known who his parents were but it is supposed by other Van Winkle researchers that he is sixth generation from Jacob Walingen and Trintje Jacobs.

"It is not known where Thomas and his wi fe Elizabeth White Smart were married but their first child was born in Indiana about 1828. They are listed in Missouri census: 1840 Taney Co., 1850 Ozark Co. and in Lampasas Co., Texas in 1860.

"It is believed that Thomas and probabl y Elizabeth died in Lampasas Co., Texas. When they grew too old to work they li ved in a cabin near their daughter, Deida Hatley Parker, on her farm near Lampa sas."

From the notes of Rose Ann Newby Westfall, Somerville, TX. 
Van Winkle, Thomas Benton (I4680)
 
127 "[1041] SURNAME: For generations the surname of Samuel Stewart's wife, Lydia, h as been assumed to be Harrison. The Harrison family of Sussex Co., Delaware def initely moved to and settled in Augusta Co., Virginia. Since there was an Isaia h Harrison and Samuel and Lydia named a son, Isaiah, many people have assumed t ha Lydia's maiden surname was Harrison. But there's no proof concerning this, e xcept that she named a son, Isaiah. Researcher: Joyce Lindstrom.

"WILL: In the same year that Samuel made out his will, he passed away. On 11 January 1771 , just three years later, Lydia made a will and as the records show she undoubt edly died almost immediately after making the will, because the deat date and w ill date are shown on the record as the same day. This probably isn't the case, but certainly she didn't live long after she made the will. Samuel ha willed t he specific property to his four older sons and so in Lydia's will she willed s pecifically to the other children, however, she did mention all the different o nes in the will which is as follows:
"In the name of God, Amen. I, Lydia Stew art of Rowan County in North Carolina, being weak of body, but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be given unto God, d dispose of my worldly estate as follows : I will that out of my estate, a list t be obtained for a certain tract of lan d on the south side of the Yadkin River, adjoining Benjamin and James Herson's land, and if such title can be obtained, to be sold and the sales thereof to be equally divided unto my beloved sons, David, Samuel, John, Joseph, and Isaiah Stewart.
Item: I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter, Lydia, the daughter of my son David, my bed and furniture there unto belonging.
Item: I give unt o my son DAVID, my bed and furniture thereunto belonging. Item: I give unto my son Benjamin an iron pot now in his possession.
Item: I give unto my son Jose ph's daughter, Lydia, a heifer or a young cow.
Item: I bequeath unto my belov ed sons, David, Samuel, Isaiah and John Stewart, all the rest of my estate to b e equally divided amongst them, and their heirs. do nominate and appoint my son s David Stewart and Samuel Stewart executors of this, my last will and testamen t, Ratifying, allowing, and confirming this to b my Last Will and Testament and do utterly disannul all former wills by me made in testimony whereof I set my hand and seal. January 11, 1771." (Please note that Lydia Stewart made out her will stating she lived in Rowan County, North Carolina. Actually Surry Co, Nort h Carolina was created from Rowan Co. in 1770.)"

From http://www.stewartkin. com 
(Harrison?), Lydia (I4642)
 
128 "[1187] SOURCE: Information on this family is from Sue Stepp, e-mail:bbm34@prod igy.net as of 3 July 1999."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Copeland, Joel Josiah (I4762)
 
129 "[1188] SOURCE: Information on this family is from Sue Stepp, e-mail:bbm34@prod igy.net as of 3 July 1999."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Bilbrey, Sarah Ann (I4763)
 
130 "[1845] SOURCE: Information on this family is from Sue Stepp, e-mail:bbm34@prod igy.net as of 3 July 1999."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Copeland, James R. (I4760)
 
131 "[257] MARRIAGE: Bond dated 12/15/1768-Rowan Co.,NC

"BIOGRAPHY: Joseph Stew art was born about 1740. He was the son of Samuel Stewart & Lydia Harrison Stew art. His father Samuel moved to Rowan Co., N.C. in 1757. Sometime about 1761 he was married to Sarah Gilbert in Rowan Co., N.C. Sarah was the daughter of Will iam Gilbert & Lucy Conway. Joseph & Sarah were probably married in either Stoke s Co. or Yadkin Co., NC. Stokes County is adjacent to Yadkin Co. Their 1st chil d, David, was born in Stokes Co. Joseph lived in Stokes Co., NC during 1750 and by 1751 he had moved back to Yadkin Co. NC. By 1768 he and his family had move d to Rowan Co., NC & in 1780 he was living in what ultimately became Washington Co., TN. Before TN became a state, the entire area was part of NC. By 1781 the county lines had been changed and where he lived was then in Overton Co., TN w here his son Samuel was born on 3-15-1781. This area of TN is in the central pa rt of the state just south of the current Kentucky border.
Joseph was one of the county's earliest settlers. The earliest mention of land ownership of Josep h in this area appears in a deed (E-415, Overton Co.,) recorded where Jesse Ste wart, his son , sold 25 acres of land on the Roaring River to John Lea on 2-14- 1824. The land was on Matthews Creek and described a follows: "Beginning at a h ickory & red oak the NE corner of Samuel Stewart's tract of 50 acres, running t hence north...including the plantation where said Stewart formerly lived, which land was granted to Joseph Stewart, deceased by the State of TN, No. 421, date d 3-9-1784, founded on warrant 360, & made over t Jesse Stewart by Will, all wh ich will appear reference being has to the origina grand & deed."
On 10-23-17 82, Joseph received a grant for 285 acres in Washington Co., NC (now in TN). Th e price paid for the grant was 50 shillings for each 100 acres of th grant. On 9-20-1787, Joseph received a grant for 400 acres in Green Co., NC , on the wate rs of Bent & Mulberry Creeks.
The earliest known name for this area was Watug a. In 1776, the people of Wautaga Settlement petitioned to be annexed to the St ate of NC and the Legislature established Washington Co., in 1777 & it included all of present da Tennessee. The separate State of Tennessee was created in 17 96 & Overton Co. was ultimately created in 1806. The two above listed grants we re to ultimately be in Overton Co. During the early 1800s the Creek Indian War broke out & many of the pioneers of Overton Co. petitioned the State Assemblly for the right to raise a force of 500 mounted men to fight the various tribes o f the Creeks. On 3-31-1813, 132 persons signed this petition and forwarded it t o the State Assembly. David Stewart, one of Joseph's sons, was the 90th person to sign the petition. Shortly thereafter, David & a number of Overton mounted m en from the County participated in the Creek Indian War.
The area where Josep h and Sarah lived included a church & cemetery sometimes called Twelve Corners. Joseph's name appears in the minutes of the Green River Assn. of Baptists whic h met at Dripping Springs Meeting House in Barren Co., KY just to the north of Overton Co. as a messenger. This meeting on Saturday, Jul 25, 1801, included th e Roaring River Church and messengers. The foundation of the old Roaring River Church can still be seen near the Roaring River Cem. It is not known exactly wh en Joseph died, but it is known that he died sometime before 1824. This is know n because in the land sale to John Lea in Feb. 1824, Joseph Stewart is said to be deceased. When Jesse sold his father Joseph's land to John Lea in 2-1824, he states that he gained title by a Will but no such Wil has been found. The Will could have been destroyed during the Civil War as many records were. It is pre sumed that Sarah also died in Overton Co., and both are buried in the Roaring R iver Cemetery.
Joseph's father in 1768 devised to him and his brother Benjami n the land he was living on. Benjamin sold 124 acr

JOSEPH STEWART AND SARAH GILBERT FAMILY
By J.T. Stewart, a descendant of Jesse Stewart
Joseph Stewart left Jefferson County and arrived with his family in Overton County, Tn. then Jackson about 1800. This makes him one of the county’s earliest settlers. Joseph’s parents were Samuel Stewart and Lydia Harrison of Augusta County, VA where Joseph was probably born about 1740. Joseph’s father Samuel received a grant of 508 acres from Lord Granville in Rowan County, NC and the family moved from Virginia to North Carolina about 1758. Joseph Stewart is listed in the Rowan County Tax List of 1761 when he came of legal age. Joseph and Samuel are mentioned in the "Wachovia Diary" under date of 24 Aug 1761 in Stokes/Forsyth Co., NC this being a diary of the German Moravian sect which settled in Stokes, Forsyth and Surry Co., NC. In 1779, Joseph Stewart sold the land he had received by inheritance from his father in what was then Surry Co., NC and traveled westward. Tax lists show he was in Washington Co., NC now Tennessee for the years 1780 through 1783. By 1784 Joseph Stewart was in Jefferson Co., and court records show he was there as late as Aug 1796. The earliest date Joseph shows up in Overton/Jackson Co. is 1801. He and Thomas McBride are listed on old church minutes, 25 July 1801, as messengers from Roaring River Baptist Church to the Green River Association of Baptists in Barren County, KY. On 23 Sep 1823 Joseph Stewart received a land grant from the state of Tennessee. On 14 Feb 1824 an Overton Co. deed from Jesse Stewart to John Lee, refers to the will of Joseph Stewart wherein Jesse Stewart received land by virtue of the will. Thus it would appear that Joseph Stewart died between 23 Sep 1823 and 14 Feb 1824. Joseph Stewart married Sarah Gilbert and they had 12 children, all of whom came to Overton Co. with Joseph about 1800. The children are listed as follows with a few lines of biographical data when known.
Lydia b. ab. 1762 m. to Abraham Howard. Abraham died in Jefferson Co. 1795. Lydia had 8 children and she and the children moved to Madison Co., Ill before 1820. The Howards are prominently mentioned in "History of Madison Co., Illinois" Saline Township as being some of the earliest settlers.
Joseph Stewart Jr. b. ab. 1764. He may have been married twice, 1st to Sarah Copeland as LDS records show and 2nd to Jane or Jennie Davis. He left Overton Co. and lived in wilderness area of Bledsoe Co. in the 1820’s on land he had surveyed. In Aug 1827 he bought 55 acres of land on Roaring River from Caleb Willis. In Apr 1828 he sold the 55 acres to James Dodson, his brother-in-law. About this time he reportedly went to Johnson Co., Ark. The names of his children are not known but David K. Stewart b. Overton Co. 1813 and William H. Stewart b. Overton Co. in 1823 may have been two of them.
Margaret (Patsy) b. ab. 1768 m. to James Dodson. Very little is known about James Dodson except he seems to have been fervently religious as the minutes of the old Spring Creek Baptist Church had this entry for Apr 1845: "Brother James Dodson liberated to sing, pray, and exhort when he feels like doing so in the bounds of the church." Names of the children are not known except John Larkin Dodson who m. Mary Ann Curtis may have been connected.
Benjamin Stewart b. ab. 1772 d. 1847 Overton Co. m. twice 1st Sarah Davis 2nd Polly ? not Polly Mayfield as some sources show. Benjamin Stewart was a farmer and Baptist preacher and is mentioned several times in minutes of the old Spring Creek Baptist Church. He lived in Bledsoe Co. for a while on land he had surveyed in the wilderness area. He had 12 children, 9 by his 1st wife. His will is recorded in Overton Co. deed K-333 July 1841 which was later proven in Nov 1847, he left all his property to his wife Polly, but deeds do not show how Polly disposed of the lands she received. None of the children were in the will, and to date their names are not known.
John Stewart, b. ab. 1772 d. 1846 Overton Co., m. 1st Elizabeth Norris 2nd Keziah ?. They had at least 4 children: John C.; Melinda m. Wm. K. Wyatt; Robert; and Margaret m. Benjamin Whitehead. All of John’s descendants appear to have left Overton Co. shortly after he died. A descendant of Benjamin and Margaret Whitehead has turned up in Vine, Cal.
Nancy Stewart, b. 1775 d. in Overton Co. after 1850, did not marry.
Elizabeth Stewart b. ab. 1778 m. 1798 to John Raney, a Rev. War veteran. Elizabeth was his second wife. There were 6 or so children. One son William b. 1812 was married to Elvira Gist a daughter of Russell and Nancy Isham Gist. The John Raney family went to Independence Co., Ark. where he died in Feb. 1847, age 92.
Sarah Stewart b. ab. 1780 m. 19 Dec 1802 James Matthews. James was in the War of 1812 and his military records show he was killed in the battle at Talledega, Ala. On 9 Nov 1813. Sarah applied for a pension and listed 7 children. The children were: John Matthews m. Sarah Shookman-Shoukman; Sarah m. William G. Roberts an early tax collector of Overton Co.; Cynthia d. young; Lawrence m. Agnes Poston; Elizabeth m. Peter Fite; Nancy m. Caleb Cooper; and Dorcas m. Hiram Pitts. Other sources list other children as James, William, and a son who accidentally shot himself, but Sarah made no mention of them in her pension application of 12 Feb 1817. A Richard Matthews, 59, b. NC appears on the 1850 Pulaski Co., Missouri census. He is probably the same Richard Matthews who on Overton deed F-208 Apr 1830, deeded 150 acres on Roaring River to David Stewart and expected "one square rod including the grave of my father." The father may have been Lawrence Matthews and James and Richard brothers sons of Lawrence.
Samuel Stewart b. 15 Mar 1781 d. Overton Co. ab. 1822, m. Polly Kitchner. Children were: Sarah J. b. 1802 m. Joshua Stapp; John Gilbert b. 1811 m. 3 times 1st Margaret Copeland, 2nd Sarah Ruth Allison and 3rd Amanda Tennison; and Samuel B. b. 1815 m. Elizabeth W. Matthews. There was also a Benjamin K. Stewart b. 1808 closely connected with this family who quite likely was a son of Samuel also.
William Stewart b. ab. 1786 died in Lee County, Iowa in 1837 m. 1st Elizabeth VanHooser and 2nd Rebecca Lewellyn. Children of first wife were: Squire, Riley, Levi, William Jackson, and Urban Van. This family went to Madison County, Illinois, where some of the children joined the Mormon movement in its earliest stages and went on to Utah. A great number of descendants are to be found in the western part of the country. Levi Stewart for instance had 28 children by 3 wives although his second wife, Margery, and five children perished in a fort fire at Kanab, Utah. Morris Udall former Senator from Arizona and one time presidential candidate was a descendant of Levi Stewart.
Jesse Stewart, youngest child of Joseph and Sarah Gilbert Stewart b. July 1790 died ab. 1862, m. to Jemima West daughter of Stephen and Mary Belk West. Jesse Stewart was an early Baptist preacher and was ordained to preach according to Rev. J.H. Grime Baptist Historian at the old Roaring River church also known as "Twelve Corners." Incidentally the name "Twelve Corners," according to Mr. Mark Copeland who was familiar with the old church before it was torn down came from the architectural shape of the church that being in the shape of a cross, which of course has twelve corners. Children of Jesse Stewart and Jemima West were as follows: Janey b. 26 Feb 1813; Preston Stewart b. 12 July 1815 d. 20 Mar 1875 bur. Stewart Cem. In Putnam Co., Tn m. 10 May 1835 Jane Brown; Harrison b. 7 May 1817 d. 1 Jan 1893 bur. Smellage Cem., Putnam Co., Tn m. Sarah Brown; Hirum b. 30 Mar 1819; Enon b. 6 May 1821 m. 4 Jan 1845 White Co. to Sarina Cordle; Ceburn b. 10 Feb 1823 d. 19 Mar 1879 m. Dorinda Brown; Asa b. 19 Feb 1825 m. 17 Oct 1855 Sarah Davis; Anthony D. b. 21 Jan 1827 m. Mary A. ?; Erviney b. 22 Oct 1829 m. T.A. Porter; Levashure b. 17 Oct 1831 m. 5 Oct 1853 Angeline Finley; Almarinda b. 14 Jan 1834; Jemima b. 19 Jan 1836 m. 9 Dec 1864 in Todd Co., KY Francis Marion Seger; Mary b. 21 Feb 1838 d. 10 Aug 1874 m. B.A.W. Davis; and Sarah b. 1839.
There was a John Stewart family in Overton Co. living on Ashburn Creek in the early 1800’s but no relation to Joseph Stewart. This John Stewart’s children were: Josiah; Gibson; Fleming; Levina m. John McDonald; Nancy m. Obadiah Hickey; Lucinda also m. Obadiah Hickey when Nancy died; Penelope m. William Payne; and Jane .m Benjamin R. Harrison.

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Stewart, Joseph (I4638)
 
132 "[259] BIOGRAPHY: RESEARCHER JOYCE LINDSTROM: Dr. John Stewrt, b. abt 1666 in S cotland; moved to Hempstead, Nassau Co, New York at an early date where he met and married ELIZABETH ALBERTUS abt. 1689. They moved to jamaica, Queens Co., Ne York by 1694 and to Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co., New Jersey by 1697. He left a wi ll in Sussex Co., Delaware dated 2 Sept 1704 which was proven 13 Jan 1705. I hi s will he states that all of his children are under age. Therefore all of them had to be under the age of 18 by 1704 when he made outhis will. After he died, his widow married THOMAS DAVOCK, who left a will dated 27 Jan 1718/9 and proved 25 Feb 1718/9. The children named in his will are: Samuel, David, John Elizabe th, William, Hannah and Mary.

"BIOGRAPHY: RECEIVED THIS INFO FROM MARY STEW ART HICKS. John Stewart was born about 1660-65. It is generally thought, by man y genealogists, that he was born in Charleston, MA and was the son of Alexander Stewart & Hanna Templar, Alexander's 1st wife.

"John & his brother & siste rs were baptized on 5-8-1675 in Charlestown, MA. The first record found of Dr. Stewart after he became an adult was in Hempstead Twp , Long Island, New York. On 7-11-1691, he petitioned the freeholders of Hempstead, Nassau Co., New York for a right of 18 or 20 acres of land a little east of The "Pine Point", near t he Plain Edge", stating that he was a cooper an also a surgeon.(A cooper is a p erson who makes bowls, barrels & water tanks from wooden boards. He needed to b e highly skilled in woodworking for this trade).

"Sometime before 7-11-1691 , he had married Elizabeth Alberti, daughter of Jan (John) Alberti & Elizabeth Scudder. By 3-29-1694, Dr. Stewart & Elizabeth had moved to Jamaica, Queens Co. , NY and is recorded as selling a piece of propert to John Pollehemus. The parc el of land was at a place called Oldfields Island. By 1697, he and his wife mov ed to Monmouth Co., New Jersey. On May 24, he bought several tracts of land fro m Isaac Ong in Shrewsbury & on 10-21-1697, he bought 150 acres of land adjoinin g the original tracts. These last 150 acres were purchased from Mary & Susanna Barnes of New York City who were the daughters of Thomas Barnes, late of Shrews bury.

"In 1700, he became the High Sheriff of Monmouth Co., New Jersey & he ld the position until sometime in 1702 when he was succeeded by Jonathan Bailey . It i not known whether he lost the election to Bailey or he chose not to run for the office again. However, later Bailey was killed and John became the High Sheriff again, & held the office for 18 years. (Per Joyce Lindstrom: This is d oubtful as John died in 1704 in Sussex Co., Del.)

"On 8-27-1700, the grand jury indicted Richard Salter & 14 other men "for riotously assembling on the 17 th day of July & assaulting John Stewart, High Sheriff, & Henry Leonard on the path near to the house of Alexander Adams, beat & grievously wounded the said p ersons, took their swords from them, break them, & carried them away & kept the m, to the value of 5 pounds money of the province in breech of the peace & the terror of the King's league people." The above indictment is recorded in the Ne w Jersey Historical Society Coll., F. 853.626,Pg. 352).

"Sometime after 170 2, he moved to Sussex Co., DE, where he bought 200 acres of land in Wolf Pit Ne ck of Angola Neck from Owen Yorke. By the standards of the day, Dr. Stewart was quite a prominent citizen & a large landowner during his residence in New Jers ey & Deleware. He practiced as a surgeon.

"He made his will 9-2-1704 with J ames Simpson, Samuel Knowles & Roger Corbett as witnesses. In his Will, he iden tified his profession as chirurgeon (surgeon). Dr. Stewart died shortly thereaf ter, probably just after the 1st of Jan., 1705. His Will was proved in court, i n Sussex Co., DE on 1-13-1705. In his Will, he named his children: Samuel, Davi d, John, Elizabeth, William, Hannah & Mary. He made his wife executrix and auth orized her to sell any part of his land in Sussex 
Stewart, Dr. John (I4756)
 
133 "[260] WILL: The will of John "Albertus" of Newtown, dated 14 Jan 1689/90 and p roved 20 May 1691, is recorded in Queens County Liber A, Wills page 44 (this Li ber contains separate pages for will and deeds). Two abstracts of this will wer e checked, one by Amos Canfield in the NYGBR 65:117, the other by Wm. A. D. Ear deley in his "Records in the Office of the Conty Clerk at Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 1680-1781"(1918). Both agree that the will names the following persons: My wif e, Elizabeth Albertus; my sons John and Samuel Albertus; my daughter Elizabeth Howard; my daughter Mehitabel; and my daughter Deliverance Graves.
NOTES: In Cora Snapp's "Historical Notes of Newtown, Collected by James Riker", she lists John Alburtus' 1689 Will as among those abstracted by Riker in his "Memoria Vo l. 7", but she does not give the abstract. The Memoria Volumes are available in the Manuscripts Division of the New York Public Library, upon application. One cannot help but suspect that Riker read John Alburtis' Will as "my daughter El izabeth Steward." This becomes more likely when it is known that the present co py of the will at Jamaica is almost certainly not that seen by Riker. Sometime in the late 19th century, almost certainly after Riker published his book, the old Liber A was replaced by a new handwirtten transcription, and the old Liber has never been seen since that time. Whoever was employed to make the transcrip t is know to have made errors in deciphering proper names, no doubt because man y of the earliest clerks used the old "Secretary Hand" and other handwriting ve ry different from our own. It is quite possible that "Steward" could be misread as "Howard". There was a Howard family in Newtown, also well known to Riker, b ut there does not appear to be any place for a wife Elizabeth in that family as of 1689. Source: Research report of Harry Macy, Jr. to Monte Stewart."

From http://wwww.stewartkin.com 
Alburtis, Elizabeth (I4757)
 
134 "[363] BIOGRAPHY: Samuel Stewart was born 3-15-1781, in Washington Co., TN., (n ow Overton Co.). He was the son of Joseph Stewart & Sarah Gilbert Stewart. Samu el married Mary (Polly) Kitchen or Kitchner about 1799 in Washington Co., TN af ter it became a state. Mary was born 11-10-1783, but it is not known where she was born. Census records of Overton Co. indicate that there was a Kitchner fami ly living there but it is not known if she was related to them. The dates of bi rth of both Samuel & Mary are recorded in the Stewart Family Bible. On 8-18-181 6, grant to Samuel Stewart from the State of TN was recorded. This grant was fo r 50 acres and was in the 3rd Dist. & 11th Sect. in Overton Co., TN. The grant had originally been surveyed & granted to Wm. Mitchell on 7-31-1807. On 8-2-182 2, Samuel recorded a grant from the State of TN for 30 acres. This grant was or iginally issued to Stephen Copeland on 9-22-1809 (Grant No. 12169). The locatio n of this property was along the Roaring River & a number of land transactions used this land in describing adjoining property. Part of this land was sold by John Gilbert Stewart in 1838 & at the time it was still in the name of Samuel S tewart. The remaining part was sold in 1849 by Joshua Stapp & it also was still in the name of Samuel Stewart. Since title to the land had not changed, it wou ld be a logical assumption that they had received this land by inheritance. Thi s is only speculation because no Will has been found. The Overton Co. Courthous e burned during the Civil War & many of the records were destroyed. Samuel prob ably died before April of 1824 because at that time Joshua Stapp obtained prope rty that adjoined the 30 acre tract of Samuel Stewart and it mentioned "where t he Widow Stewart now lives". Census records of 1830 lists Mary Stewart as head of a household. Some of the children of Samuel & Sarah are mentioned in a Bible notation in the Stapp Family Bible as Sarah who married Joshua Stapp & Uncle J ohn, Uncle Ben & Uncle Sam. These three uncles would have been John Gilbert Ste wart, Benjamin K. Stewart & Samuel K. Stewart. The notation does not mention th eir brother David K. Stewart. The Bible notation also mentions Cicero Stewart, Sheriff of Eddy Co., NM. This Miles Cicero Stewart was the Great Grandson of Sa muel & Mary Stewart. Cicero lost the election for sheriff to Les Dow but the Co mmissioners appointed him to fill the term of Dow who was shot by Dave Kemp. Af ter that appointment, he was re-elected & held the Sheriff's Office for 18 year s. He was instrumental in breaking up the Black Jack Ketchum gang in Aug. & Sep t. of 1899, capturing Ezra Lay (McGinnis) & Black Bob McManus. Ketchum was capt ured and sentenced to hang. When the hanging finally took place, he had gained so much weight while in jail that his head was literally jerked from his body a s he dropped from the gallows

"DEATH: Samuel must have died sometime betwee n 1820 & 1824. No records indicate when or where Mary died. It is assumed both Samuel & Mary died in Overton Co. both were buried in the old Roaring River Cem etery, Overton Co., TN.

"NOTES: Samuel Stewart along with his brothers John and Benjamin are listed on the 1802 Tax List of Jackson Co., Tennessee.

"S ource: Database of Mary Stewart Hicks: Samuel P. Stewart was born March 15, 178 1 in Washington Co., TN. He was the son of Joseph & Sarah (Gilbert) Stewart. He died about 1824. He married Mary "Polly" Kitchner October 12, 1800 in TN. Mary was born November 21, 1783. They both died in Overton Co., TN and are buried i n the Roaring River Cemetery. Samuel was granted 50 acres in 1816. In 1822, Sam uel recorded a grant from the State of TN for 30 acres. They had three children - Sarah "Sallie" Stewart b. April 30, 1802. Sarah Married Joshua Stapp Benjami n K. Stewart b. March 23, 1808 and died September 24, 1872 in Travis Co. TX. He married Sarah; John Gilbert Stewart b. March 13, 1811 in Overton Co., TN and d ied May 23, 1875 in Burnet Co., TX Bur. Mahomet Ce 
Stewart, Samuel P. (I4636)
 
135 "[367] !BURIAL: Mahomet Cemetery, Mahomet, Burnet Co., Texas

"BIOGRAPHY: Jo hn Gilbert was sent as a messenger from the Roaring River Church, Overton Co., Tennessee, a member of the Stockton Valley Assn. The church dropped from the St ockton Valley Assn. in 1844. He lived and owned property on Sulphur Lick Branch on the waters of the Roaring River in Overton Co.,Tennessee John Gilbert sold his property in Feb. 1850 and moved to Lawrence Co., Arkansas as 1850 census sh ows. They came to Texas by way of train in 1851 or 1852 and settled in the Gabr iel Mills community on the North San Gabriel, western edge of Williamson Co., T exas. John Gilbert had made a previous trip to Arkansas, after 1830, but he did not stay there. He died in Mahomet, Burnett, Txas. He was a Christian Minister .

"!MARRIAGE: J. G. Stewart married Amanda Tannison, in Feb 1874 in Burnet County, Texas. The J.P. was C. C. Stewart. I assume this is Christopher Columbu s Stewart Source: Burnet County Marriage Records, Book A., 1868-1874, R-Y, page 253. Researcher: Georgenia Stewart, 22 March 2000."

From http://www.stewart kin.com 
Stewart, Rev. John Gilbert (I4632)
 
136 "[409] !MARRIAGE: C.C. Stewart Married Charlotte Williams, 15 Jul 1858, in Burn et County, Texas. Source: Burnet County Marriage REcords, Book A., 1852-1868, O -Y, page 127. Researcher: Georgenia Stewart, 22 March 2000.

"Alternate deat h date is 5 Jan 1875."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Williams, Charlotte (I4623)
 
137 "[811] SOURCE: Research conducted by Dr. John Valentine. See letter at http://w ww.Stewartkin.com on the Stewart family written by Gilbert Stewart.

"BIOGRA PHY: On the 9th of May 1757, Samuel purchased 508 acres of land on the East sid e of the Yadkin River in Rowan County, North Carolina. On August 10, 1762, he p urchased another 332 acres of land also located next to the Yadkin river. He's listed in the 1759, 1761, and 1768 tax lists of Rowan County. On August 11, 176 6 Samuel sold his land of 153 acres located in Augusta County, Virginia, to a J acob Caplin for thirty pounds. This land was located on the South Fork of Linvi lle's Creek, which was patented to Samuel on September 5, 1749. According to th at deed, at that time Samuel was living in North Carolina
Research by Joyce L indstrom.

"WILL: In 1768 Samuel made a will (that was probated in 1770) whi ch is as follows: In the name of God, Amen, I Samuel Stewart, being weak in bod y but in perfect mind and memory, thanks be to God for it and knowing it is app ointed fo all men once to die, do make and appoint this my Last Will and Testam ent. First, I commit my soul to almight God that gave it and my body to the ear th to be buried in a decent Christian manner at the descretion of my Exectors. Item 1: I give and bequest all my movable estate to my well beloved wife LIDDY STEWART, to use and dispose of at her own descretation.
Item 2: I give and be quest the tenement or tract of land I now live on to my so JOSEPH STEWART and t o my son BENJAMIN STEWART, to be equally divided in quanity and quality and I d o constitute and appoint my son DAVID STEWART and my son SAMUEL STEWART, my Exe cutors in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand thi 20th day of Aug 1768
In the same year that Samuel made the will, he passed away. On 11 January 177 1, just three years later, Lydia made a will and as the records show, she undou btedly died almost immediately after making the will, because the death date an d will date are shown on the record as the same day. This probably isn't the ca se, but certainly she didn't live long after she made the will. Samuel ha wille d the specific property to his four older sons and so in Lydia's will she wille d specifically to the other children, however, she did mention all the differen t ones in the will.

"BIRTH: The 1759, 1761, and 1768 tax lists of Rowan Co. , North Carolina are use to determine the birth order of the children. The 1759 tax list records Samuel with his two adult sons, David and John Stewart. The 1 761 tax list records Samuel with his sons; David, John, Samuel, Joseph and Isai ah. The 1768 tax lis records Samuel with David, Joh, Joseph, Isaiah and Benjami n, the baby in the family. Researcher: Joyce Lindstrom."

From http://www.ste wartkin.com

Samuel Stewart (abt 1711) and Wife Lydia
By Joseph T. Stewart, grandson
The Heritage of Rowan County North Carolina Volume 1, 1991 and Stewart Clan Magazine, May 1947 and May 1950
Samuel Stewart was born around 1711 in Sussex County Delaware. He was a son of David Stewart of that county. David was born around 1690 in Queens County, New York. David was a son of John Stewart and Elizabeth Albertus. John Stewart was born in 1660 in Scotland. His wife, Elizabeth Albertus was a daughter of John Albertus born in 1643 in Kings County, New York. He was a son of Pietro Cesar Alberto, a merchant from Italy. Elizabeth's mother as Elizabeth Scudder. John Stewart and Elizabeth Albertus were married about 1687. They lived in New York, New Jersey and Delaware. They finally settled in Sussex County Delaware. According to my records, John and Elizabeth had seven children: Samuel born in 1688; David born in 1690; John born in 1694; Elizabeth born in 1696; William born in 1698; Hannah born in 1700; and Mary born in 1702. John died in 1705. Elizabeth remarried Thomas Davock and she had at least two children by him.
Samuel Stewart descends from this old Stewart family in America. Samuel, born in 1711, married around 1723 Lydia Harrison of Augusta County, Virginia. To this union were born six sons: David, born in 1725, who married Abigail, last name unknown, died in 1807 in Stokes county NC; Samuel born in 1727, married Elizabeth, last name unknown; John, born in 1729, married Susanna Fulkerson Bledsoe; Isiah born in 1731 married Mary Coe September 1, 1764; Joseph born in 1733 married Sarah Gilbert; Benjamin born in 1736 married Elizabeth Winscott on August 16, 1769.
In 1762, Samuel and wife Lydia moved to Rowan County, now present day Yadkin or Forsyth County. Two of their sons came earlier, David and Samuel Jr. Samuel had a 508 acre land grant by Lord Earl Granville. This grant was dated May 9, 1757.
Samuel Stewart died in 1770. Lydia died about a year later. Joseph and Benjamin got the home-place. They evidently sold this land and moved. Joseph moved to Tennessee and Benjamin probably moved to a Southwest Virginia County or a Northwest County of North Carolina.
Samuel Stewart and wife Lydia were one of the first pioneer families to settle in the Yadkin Valley. According to my records, they lived on Linville Creek in present day Rockingham County, Virginia. They lived near Daniel Boone’s parents in this area. No doubt they knew each other there and they probably made the trip here together to North Carolina.
Samuel Stewart and Lydia have many descendants all over the state of North Carolina and many states of our union. A family of great strength and determination that helped toll the way for growth in Rowan County. Samuel and Lydia will always live on – in the hearts of the ones honored to carry their lineage.

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Stewart, Samuel (I4641)
 
138 "[817] !BIRTH:
J.T. Stewart lists birthdate as 1690
On 9-2-1704 Dr. John St ewart made a will with James Simpson,Samuel Knowles & Roger Corbett as witnesse s. In his will, proved in court, in Sussex Co., DE on 1-13-1705, he listed as o ne of his children, David.

"BIOGRAPHY: Researcher Joyce Lindstrom: David wa s born about 1692 in Hempstead Nassau, NY. He was underage in 1704 when his fat her made out his will. He died in 1718 as he left an inventory dated 25 Feb 171 8/9 in Sussex Co., Del. According to his inventory, he had no cradle and only e nough utensils for him t eat with. His inventory is that of a bachelor. David w as a carpenter. He owned land, but I don't know what happened to his share of l and he received fro his father unless he sold it to his brothers.

"BIOGRAPH Y: From the database of Mary Stewart Hicks: David Stewart was born in New York City about 1680 or shortly thereafter. He was the son of Dr. John Stewart and E lizabeth Alberti. Elizabeth was the daughter of Jan (John) Albert and Elizabeth Scudder. It is not known how long he and his parents lived in Ne York. We do k now that he and his Father, Dr. John Stewart, still lived in New York in 1686 w hen his father was a witness to a land transaction between Adam Wright & Willia m Buckler. This transaction was also witnessed by John Townsend & John Newman. John Townsend & Adam Wright were of the Townsend & Wright families that were al so related to the Stewarts. Sometime before 1697 the family had moved to Monmou th Co., New Jersey, in the town of Shrewsbury. Shortly after the family arrived in Monmouth Co., his father (Dr. John Stewart) became the High Sheriff of the County. David was probably married (circa 1710) while he lived in New Jersey bu t the name of his wife is not know. Sometime after 1702, he and his father and their families moved to Sussex Co., Delaware, to the town of Lowe.

"David's profession is generally thought to be a carpenter and he and his wife lived in Lowe, Delaware until his early death in 1719. It is generally presume that his wife had died sometime before his death in 1719. He probably did not leave a W ill because his estate was administered on February 25, 1718 by his brother Joh n and no mention is made of a wife. John asked the court to grant him letters o f administration on David's estate, which the court granted. The names of David 's children are not shown in the records extant. A valuation of his estate was made on May 10, 1719 by John Hall & William Darter, a neighbor o his mother and stepfather, Thomas Davock. This valuation and inventory was presented to the C ourt on May 11, 1719, and included 100 acres of land valued a 20 pounds, two-ye ar old mare valued at 1 pount-25 shillings, saddle & bridle valued at 5 pounds and a sword valued at 2 shillings-sixpence. The estate totaled 38 pounds. It is supposed that none of his children were adults when he died and they were prob ably raised by his brother John or their mother's family He was probably buried in Sussex Co., Delaware."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Stewart, David (I4754)
 
139 "[819] NOTES: After going through all the know remaining published sources, it appeared that nothing had been found that identified John Stewart's wife as Eli zabeth Alburtis. Yet James Riker stated in "Anals of Newton", (1852) that John Stewart did marry Elizabeth, duaghter of John Alburtis. Riker is known to have been a careful researcher, who utilized the then largely unpublished New York p rimary sourses.
WILL: The will of John "Albertus" of Newtown, dated 14 Jan 16 89/90 and proved 20 May 1691, is recorded in Queens County Liber A, Wills page 44 (this Liber contains separate pages for will and deeds). Two abstracts of th is will were checked, one by Amos Canfield in the NYGBR 65:117, the other by Wm . A. D. Eardeley in his "Records in the Office of the Conty Clerk at Jamaica, L . I., N. Y. 1680-1781"(1918). Both agree that the will names the following pers ons: My wife, Elizabeth Albertus; my sons John and Samuel Albertus; my daughter Elizabeth Howard; my daughter Mehitabel; and my daughter Deliverance Graves.
NOTES: In Cora Snapp's "Historical Notes of Newtown, Collected by James Riker" , she lists John Alburtus' 1689 Will as among those abstracted by Riker in his "Memoria Vol. 7", but she does not give the abstract. The Memoria Volumes are a vailable in the Manuscripts Division of the New York Public Library, upon appli cation. One cannot help but suspect that Riker read John Alburtis' Will as "my daughter Elizabeth Steward." This becomes more likely when it is known that the present copy of the will at Jamaica is almost certainly not that seen by Riker . Sometime in the late 19th century, almost certainly after Riker published his book, the old Liber A was replaced by a new handwirtten transcription, and the old Liber has never been seen since that time. Whoever was employed to make th e transcript is know to have made errors in deciphering proper names, no doubt because many of the earliest clerks used the old "Secretary Hand" and other han dwriting very different from our own. It is quite possible that "Steward" could be misread as "Howard". There was a Howard family in Newtown, also well known to Riker, but there does not appear to be any place for a wife Elizabeth in tha t family as of 1689. Source: Research report of Harry Macy, Jr. to Monte Stewar t."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Alburtis, Jan (John) (I4758)
 
140 "[820] NOTES: After going through all the know remaining published sources, it appeared that nothing had been found that identified John Stewart's wife as Eli zabeth Alburtis. Yet James Riker stated in "Anals of Newton", (1852) that John Stewart did marry Elizabeth, duaghter of John Alburtis. Riker is known to have been a careful researcher, who utilized the then largely unpublished New York p rimary sourses.
WILL: The will of John "Albertus" of Newtown, dated 14 Jan 16 89/90 and proved 20 May 1691, is recorded in Queens County Liber A, Wills page 44 (this Liber contains separate pages for will and deeds). Two abstracts of th is will were checked, one by Amos Canfield in the NYGBR 65:117, the other by Wm . A. D. Eardeley in his "Records in the Office of the Conty Clerk at Jamaica, L . I., N. Y. 1680-1781"(1918). Both agree that the will names the following pers ons: My wife, Elizabeth Albertus; my sons John and Samuel Albertus; my daughter Elizabeth Howard; my daughter Mehitabel; and my daughter Deliverance Graves.
NOTES: In Cora Snapp's "Historical Notes of Newtown, Collected by James Riker" , she lists John Alburtus' 1689 Will as among those abstracted by Riker in his "Memoria Vol. 7", but she does not give the abstract. The Memoria Volumes are a vailable in the Manuscripts Division of the New York Public Library, upon appli cation. One cannot help but suspect that Riker read John Alburtis' Will as "my daughter Elizabeth Steward." This becomes more likely when it is known that the present copy of the will at Jamaica is almost certainly not that seen by Riker . Sometime in the late 19th century, almost certainly after Riker published his book, the old Liber A was replaced by a new handwirtten transcription, and the old Liber has never been seen since that time. Whoever was employed to make th e transcript is know to have made errors in deciphering proper names, no doubt because many of the earliest clerks used the old "Secretary Hand" and other han dwriting very different from our own. It is quite possible that "Steward" could be misread as "Howard". There was a Howard family in Newtown, also well known to Riker, but there does not appear to be any place for a wife Elizabeth in tha t family as of 1689. Source: Research report of Harry Macy, Jr. to Monte Stewar t."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Scudder, Elizabeth (I4759)
 
141 "[837] Lived: There is a picture of the Andrew Swallows family in the "Stray Leaves from Putnam County History" by Mary Hopson, page 200. Andrew married Catherine Kinder and they had seven children. All family members are listed with spouses Researcher: Georgenia Stewart

"CENSUS: There are no Swallows in the 1860 Census of Putnam Co., Tn. Researcher: Georgenia Stewart."

From http://www.stewartkin.com

Andrew Swallow
in
Revolutionary War

Andrew Swallow was born April, 17, 1760 in Parks (possibly meant for Berks or Bucks) County, Pennsylvania. His name is also shown as Swallows in the pension claim. He lived there at the beginning of the Revolutionary War.
He enlisted in September 1777, shortly before the Battle of Brandywine and served two months as a private in the Pennsylvania Troops, during which he was in the Battle of Brandywine/ he enlisted next and served two months in Captain Lesher's of Berk County, Pennsylvania, Company, engaged in vicinity of Philadelphia. Both of these tours were rendered as a substitute.
Andrew Swallow enlisted in 1779 and served one year as a wagoner hauling ammunition under Captain Archibald and Wagonmaster Turner, during which he was engaged in driving between Reading, Pennsylvania and White Plains, New York.
The soldier moved in the Spring of 1780 to Wythe County, Virginia . He enlisted that fall and served one month as a private in Captain Buchanan's Virginia company during which he was in an engagement with some Tories.
He enlisted in February 1781 and served two months as private underCol. Preston during which he marched to Gulliford, North Carolina and was in a small engagement at Haw River.
He enlisted subsequently in Wythe County, Virginia, and served two months as private in Capt. Ward's Company, engaged against the Indians on the frontier. He states that he frequently saw General Washington.
Andrew Swallow moved from Wythe County, Virginia to North Carolina, thence to Overton County, Tennessee. He is believed to have come to Overton County about 1818 or 1819.
He received a Revolutionary War pension beginning the 4th of March 1831 in the amount of $26.66 per annum. He was residing in Overton County, Tennessee at that time where he lived until his death on September 30, 1843.
Andrew Swallow married Catherine Kinder who was born May 10, 1755. In 1844, she stated that she was married in the spring of 1785, also, that she was married "about the year 1785."
Andrew Swallows wrote the family data which was submitted for obtaining a pension .....
He was apparently unable to write in the English language since he signed his name by mark on his pension application.
The following family data was shown which was originally written in Dutch (Deutsche or German) and translated into English:
Andrew Swallow born April 17, 1760
Catharine born May 10, 1755
Reuben born March 2, 1783
Jacob born February 11, 1786
Magdalena born January 19, 1788 (This was Mary Magdalena known as Polly Swallows who married Isaac West)
Elizabeth born January 18, 1790
Isak born February 7, 1792
Catharine born January 15, 1794
Rachel born February 18, 1796
Jemima born October 23, 1800
Catharine Kinder Swallow had a son named Reuben before she was married to Andrew Swallow. He was apparently illegitimate. He went by the name of Reuben Finley. On the 17th day of January 1837, Catharine Swallow made an affidavit that her maiden name was Catharine Kinder and that Reuben Finley mention in the will of Thomas Finley of Abbeville, South Carolina was her son. In the Revolutionary War Pension record Andrew Swallow lists him as one of his children. Catharine Kinder Swallow died March 16, 1847.

ANDREW SWALLOW PENSION APPLICATION
State of Tennessee
Overton Circuit Court
September Term 1832
On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open court, it being a court of record, before the Honorable Nathaniel W. Williams, Circuit Judge in and for the said court in the State of Tennessee Andrew Swallow - a resident of the County of Overton and State of Tennessee aged seventy two years who being just july sworn according to the laws of the land doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of congress passed June 7th 1832. He entered the service of the United States as a private soldier under the following named officers and served as a private soldier.
He states that as he now recollects in the spring of 1778 he was hired as a substitute for a man by the .....
in the State of pennsylvania for the term of 3 months. Cannot state the Captain's name during the time he was in the Battle of Brandywine . Cannot recollect his officer's name. He was a rifleman. Soon after he returned home in the same year he again hired for two months as a substitute for a man by the name of Miller. Marched down near Philadelphia and concluded in t he neighborhood of Philadelphia until his time of service was out. He was in no battle.
Cannot recollect the name of his officer. Soon after he returned home he enlisted as a waggoner for one year during this time he went into Connecticut. Spent good part of our Summer in that state, and the Army of the United States was then at what was called White Plains. He states that her served our the whole year as a waggoner. He set out on this tour in the spring of 1778, and was principally engaged in hauling ammunition. He just set our with the wagons from a little town in Pennsylvania called Reddin and down to the Army at the White Plains aforesaid and kept in leadership with the army his Captain was name of Archilbald and his general wagonmaster was by the name of Turner. He states that he saw General Washington very frequently. He states that he served our this year as a waggoner.
He removed to Virginia in the Spring of 1780. He settled in the county of Wythe the succeeding fall he volunteered. Went with seventy six men into the State of North Carolina. His Captain was named Buchanan. The understanding was when he set out that they were to join General Green but for some cause unknown to him did not do so. But returned home in about one month during which time they had a small engagement with some Tories. Killed seventeen or eighteen Tories and had one killed. He understood when they set out that they were a volunteer company not called for. This engagement was near the Adkin River.
He the next February he volunteered. Col. Preston set out to raise volunteers and got about one hundred and fifty men, went to Guillford County, North Carolina. Joined General Green for some time. He with some more left the Army to pursue.... Tories, had a little engagement with them at Hawes River but was offered to retreat and was pursued by the British. This concludes his service as a soldier and he has found it impossible from old age and a bad memory, to give minute descriptions and more especially names and has been as explicit as he can from his present recollection. He has no documentary evidence of his services nor does he know any or by where he can prove them.
He hereby relinquishes all claims whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any clerk.
His X Mark
Andrew Swallow
Sworn to in open court the 14th day of September 1832.
George W. Irvin, Clk.
by E. N. Cullom
1st--Where and in what year were you born? In Park County in the State of Pennsylvania and in the year 1760.
2nd--Have you any record of your age and if so where is it? Answer: I have no record of my age.
3rd--Where were you living when called in the service? Where have you lived since and where do you now live? Answer: I was living in Park County, Pennsylvania, removed to Wythe County, Virginia. Moved to North Carolina and from that place to Overton County, Tennessee where I now and have ever since lived.
4th--How were you called into the service: Were you drafted? Did you volunteer and were you a substitute and if so when? Answer: As before stated I was twice a substitute. Once for a man named Read and once for Miller. Next as a waggoner and my last tour as a volunteer.
5th--State some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served such continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service. Answer: Owing to the badness of memory I can tell very few names. I knew Col. Preston and frequently saw General Green and Washington.
6th--Did you ever receive a discharge from the service and if so by whom was it given and what has become of it? Answer: I never got but one discharge and that is lost. I cannot recollect that name.
7th--State the name of some of the persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for verity and their belief of your service as a soldier in the Revolution. Answer: George Christian, Esq., Richard Copeland, Col. Stephen Copeland, Josiah Copeland, Fredric Deck, Col. John Gore and Isaac Gore, Esq.
His X Mark
Andrew Swallow
Sworn to in open court 24th September 1832.
George W. Irvin, Clk.
by E.N. Cullom
This day Henderson Bates and George Christian both citizens of Overton County in the State of Tennessee, make oath that they have for many years been aquatinted with Andrew Swallow and live in his neighborhood, and applicant.


CATHARINE SWALLOW
PENSION APPLICATION
State of Tennessee
Overton County
On the 13th day of February 1844 personally appeared before me, John Waltrip, as Acting Justice of Peace in and for the County aforesaid Mrs. Catharine Swallow a resident of said county aged eighty nine years and who after being dully sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by an act of Congress passed the 7th July 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pension to certain widows to wit that she is the widow of Andrew Swallows who was a soldier in the war of Revolution and she thinks belonged to the Pennsylvania line of troops and who on account of his service as a soldier in the Revolutionary War and in said line received a pension of $26.00 per annum and to the evidence composing the matter of the application of her said husband for said pension she refers for such facts and particulars as are necessary in the investigation of her claim. She further declares that she has no documentary evidence in support of her claim except a piece of paper containing the ages of their children also their own ages which she herewith files and further states that it is in the handwriting of her husband. She further declares that she was married to the said Andrew Swallows in the spring of seventeen hundred and eighty five and that her said husband Andrew Swallows died on the 30th day of September eighteen hundred forty three. That she was not married previous to her said husband leaving the service but the marriage took place prior to the first day of January 1794 viz. at the time above stated and that she has never since the death of her deceased husband intermarried but still continues his widow.
Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year aforesaid before me.
John Waltrip, J. P.
Her X Mark
Catherine Swallow
I just inherent magasta do hereby certify the declarant personally known to me and known to be a lady of respectability and truth and full faith and credit is due her statements and that she is half unable to approve in open court by reason of bodily disability see to do and she still remains the unmarried widow of Andrew Swallow deceased given under my hand and seal this 13th day of February 1844.
John Waltrip, J. P.
AFFIDAVIT
In order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress granting five years pension to certain widows which was prohibited their drawing by the Act of Congress of the 30th April 1844 but restored to them by the resolution of congress of the 23rd January 1845.
Whereas the Act of the 30th April 1844 prohibited me from drawing a pension for the same period during which my husband was a pensioner, I now make the following statement under oath to obtain the benefit of the Revolution above mentioned. I am the widow of Andrew Swallow who was a private of the Revolution and drew a pension at the rate of twenty six dollars per annum from the 4th March 1831 until his death which took place on the 31st day of Sept. 1843. I made application for the pension due me under the law of congress passed for the benefit of widows of Revolutionary soldiers and my papers were forwarded I suppose last spring which I have not received and now ask for the amount due me from the 4th of March 1836 to 31st day of September 1843, the day of my husband's death and for the benefit of such other causes, I am entitled to it. Affient further states that her claim was presented as she thinks by William Travis last spring claiming under the laws then existing and that the record of the ages of her children which was in her possession - going to show the time of her marriage was handed to Mr. Travis to be forwarded to the pension office. She makes the said record and other papers which were forwarded as she supposed a part of this declaration or affidavit. She further states that the record of the ages of her desceased husband and her age with the ages of her children were in the handwriting of her deceased husband and that he wrote in Dutch languages.
Sworn to and subscribed to the 18th day of March 1845 before me.
Phillip Copeland, Justice of the Peace.
Her X Mark
Katherine Swallow
I certify that the above named affiant is personally known to me and that she is the widow of Andrew Swallows who was a pensioner of this county and that she is the same individual who applied for a pension as stated by him in the foregoing affidavit that she is exceedingly old.
Phillip Copeland
Justice of the Peace
STATE OF TENNESSEE
OVERTON COUNTY
I John S. Daugherty Clerk of the County Court of said Overton County that Phillip Copeland is a Justice of the Peace as above, and that the foregoing signatures purporting to be his are genuine.
In testimony whereof I have herunto set my hand and affixed my seal of office this 18th day of March 1845.
John S. Daugherty, Clerk
Source: Standing Stone Press, Monterey, Tenn. Fall-Winter, 1981


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The Battle of Brandywine & Germantown
General Sir William Howe was the British commander and General George Washington was the American commander. The battle of Brandywine was fought on September 11, 1777, near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Philadelphia. After a month of strategic maneuvering, Sir William Howe marched his troops toward Philadelphia, the unofficial capital of America. Washington had been watching Howe carefully and rushed to stop him from reaching the city.
Howe with 18,000 men went to the American post at Brandywine Creek. They launched a full scale attack on 11,000 of George Washington's men, with Howe in front and Gen. Cornwallis to the right. The Americans were totally unaware that the British would try to cross the creek in separate places. Washington backtracked to Chester, Pennsylvania. A British pursuit was stopped by a rearguard unit, therefore, Howe could not occupy the abandoned capital until September 26. British deaths totaled to about 600 and American losses were 900 dead and wounded, along with 400 taken prisoner.
The British failure to pursue the fleeing Americans and their decision to go into camp is what ended the battle. Washington gathered his troops, marched northward and camped near Germantown. The British marched on after breaking camp and occupied Philadelphia, which the Americans had been forced to leave virtually undefended.
Of some 11,000 men in the ranks General Greene estimated that Washington lost 1,200 to 1,300 men about 400 of which were prisoners. The Americans also lost 11 guns. Of approximately 12,500 in the ranks, Howe lost 577 killed and wounded and six missing.
After Howe's victory at Brandywine, his army camped at Germantown, Pennsylvania. On October 4, 1777, Washington planned a surprise attack against the redcoats at sunrise. He broke the army into four separate columns for battle. The American soldiers marched to Germantown by two roads, with General Sullivan to the right and General Greene to the left. Washington, along with General "Mad Anthony" Wayne, joined Sulliven and caused the British to fall back.

Wythe County, Virginia
A Brief History
Wythe County was founded in 1790, from Montgomery County, which was founded from Fincastle County in 1776. Wythe County was settled early in the history of our country, primarily because of the good access to water (the New River and many creeks). The eastern end of the county was settled as early as 1745 and was known as "Mack's Meadows." This is the area now known as Max Meadows. Rough roads were established, near the path of current modern interstate highways. Early settlers in Wythe county were, in a large part, German, and Scot-Irish.
A fort was built before the Revolutionary War and was known as Fort Chiswell. It was used to protect settlers from Indian attacks. The approximate site of this fort can be seen today beside where Interstate 81 & 77 intersect. It is a stone marker in the shape of an arrowhead.
The pioneers in Fincastle (now Wythe) County were early patriots. They wrote and delivered the Fincastle Resolution (which was similar to, but earlier than, the Declaration of Independence), January 20, 1775, to the Continental Congress at Philadelphia. By the time of the Revolutionary War, lead had been found in Austinville and the Shot Tower had been built on the New River, producing ammunition used in the Revolutionary War.
In 1790, Wythe County was formed and named for George Wythe, the first Virginia signer of the Declaration of Independence. A place near the middle of the county was chosen as the place for the county seat, and was then called Evansham, although it eventually became Wytheville.


The next February or March, he volunteered in Capt. Henry Pattons Company, under the command of Col. Preston and marched immediately to the Moravian Towns and from thence down the Reedy Fork of the Haw River, where he had a battle with the British, which battle was called the battle of Whitesells Mills, on the Reedy Fork of the Haw River, our troops being beaten, he retreated and rendezvoused at Gilford C. House N.C. and from thence marched to join Gen. Greene at the Iron Works, which was in May or June of the same year, when he was discharged and returned home.
http://www.ls.net/~newriver/va/walkerrw.htm


Early in 1781 when the prospect of British control in western North Carolina and the invasion of Virginia loomed, Preston called out troops to march to the south without waiting for orders from the Governor. On 13 April 1781 he wrote Thomas Jefferson explaining that on 8 February he "called a number of the Officers together, to consult on a plan for raising a body of men on the Frontiers, for the defence of the country against the Common Enemy; . . . I believed it my duty to order out all the militia I could raise, without waiting any other call than that of the danger to which the country stood exposed. In this I was seconded by every Officer present, and in order to encourage old and young to go, who were fit to bear arms, I not only proposed to go myself, but sent for my son, just turned of sixteen, from a school in another country. I went to the Lead mines, where the militia was to rendezvous, and continued there and in the neighborhood until the 18th., when I marched with about 350 riflemen, mostly on horse-back; with whom I proceeded by long marches, until I joined Genl. Pickens, by Gen. Green's order, at no great distance from Hillsborough, and within three miles of Tarleton's Legion, who had repassed Haw River. The disaffected, and some others whom I had drawn out, deserted. With the remainder we did hard duty, under Genl. Pickens, twelve or fourteen days, on the Enemy's lines, greatly straitened for provisions. Part of the men were in one action, and the whole in the second; in both overpowered by numbers, and in the last broken and dispersed with the loss of their blankets. After which no arguments that could be made use of by myself, or the other officers, could induce the remaining few to continue another week; the time Genl. Green requested. After staying a few days at the Moravian Town, to have the wounded taken care of, Colo. Crocket and myself came home, accompanied by only two or three young men." Jefferson subsequently wrote him in commendation of his course of action: "I am obliged to you for the Narrative of your Proceedings to the Southward. It was certainly not only justifiable but laudable and even indispensably necessary that you should have proceeded as you did to oppose the public Enemy without orders from Government which it would have been fatal to have awaited." On 2 March 1781 Col. Preston's troops joined Greene's army at Guilford in North Carolina. His company with others was left to cover the rear of Pickens' wing and was attacked by British cavalry at Whitsell's Mill on 6 March 1781. In this engagement his horse took fright, dashed through the mill pond and threw its rider. Had not Col. Joseph Cloyd leaped from his horse and helped Preston to mount again, he would probably have been a casualty of the battle. Preston's troops also served at the battle of Guilford Court House on 15 March 1781. Gen. Greene appointed him on 26 Feb. 1781 as one of the commissioners to treat with the Cherokee Indians and on 24 March 1781 the Virginia Council also named him, Col. William Christian, and Maj. Joseph Martin to join with commissioners from North Carolina to make a treaty with the Cherokees, but on 17 April 1781 the Council advised the Governor to withdraw Virginia's appointment since the three were already appointed by Gen. Greene. On 20 July 1781, however, the Council appointed Preston with four others to serve as commissioners for the Western Country to settle the disbursements of public monies and other matters and to meet at the Falls of the Ohio. Preston's health had declined steadily following his return from North Carolina, and he had the premonition of apoplectic seizures a number of times during the two years following. As a result, he resigned as commissioner, and Granville Smith was appointed in his place.
http://members.tripod.com/~labach/preston.htm


Wagoner





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Site copyright 1999, 2000, 2001 Trish S. Carden (Please feel free to use this information but if you do please put a link back to this page)
Reading is a city on the Schuylkill River in southeastern Pennsylvania. The city lies in the heart of the Pennsylvania Dutch region. It is surrounded by fertile valleys that are noted for fruit growing, poultry producing, and dairy farming. Reading was designed in 1748 under the direction of two sons of William Penn. It was named for Reading, England, the ancestral home of the Penn family. During the Revolutionary War in America (1775-1783), military supplies for the Continental Army were stored in Reading. The city also was a hospital center and prison camp. Reading became a borough in 1783 and a city in 1847. It has a mayor-council form of government and is the seat of Berks County.


Swallows Table of contents
Return to Welcome Page
Disclaimer: The purpose of this Web Page is to share information for the purpose of research. I have not proved documentation of all genealogy material, nor have I kept source notes as I should. But I had lots of fun and met some great people along the way..
If you find any mistakes please contact the Web Page creator, Trisha Carden (G-Ma@home.com ), and I shall try to correct them.
Site copyright 1999, 2000, 2001 Trish S. Carden (Please feel free to use this information but if you do please put a link back to this page) 
Swallows, Andrew (I4764)
 
142 "[851] BIRTH: Alternate birth date is 10 Nov 1783.

"NAME: Surname could be Kitchens or Kitchener."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Kitchner, Margaret (I4637)
 
143 "[891] NOTES: Information from Joe Neilson, (Joseph Clyde Neilson, Mary Arrimin ta North, Hyrum Bennett North, Arriminta Howard, John Howard, Lydia Stewart, Jo sep Stewart).
The churchyard lists the children of Isaiah Harrison and Elizab eth Wright as follows:
1. Isaiah Harrison, born 27 Sept 1689, Oyster Bay, Lon g Island, New York 2. John Harrison
3. Gideon Harrison, born 25 June 1694, Oy ster Bay, Long Island, New York 4. Mary Harrison, born 25 May 1696, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, died 1781, married about 1721, Robert Cravens (1696 - M ay 1762) 5. Elizabeth Harrison, born 30 Mar 1698, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York It would seem that if Lydia's father is Isaiah Harrison, then he is Isaiah II, son of Isaiah and Elizabeth Wright. The timelines would make more sense. L ydia would then be born post 1706 or so. I spent a weekend with "Settlers by th e Long Grey Trail" Houston Harrison, 1935 and hours sifting through old Augusta records. Not a drop of evidence to support Lydia Harrison as Samuel Stewart's wife.
The Stewart Clan once believed that Lydia was the daught of Isaiah Harr ison and Elizabeth Wright. Their basis for that belief appears might slim. The fact Samuel Stewart and Lydia sold property to Robert Cravens, probably husband of Mary Harrison (daughter of Isaiah), does not make Lydia a sister to Mary ha rrison. I have sold property many times and never to a brother-in-law."

From http://www.stewartkin.com 
Harrison, Isaiah (I4723)
 
144 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hatfield, J. (I2700)
 
145 (Some confusion as to whether Frank is Jeanne's son or second husband or what..Jeanne is showed as marrying Mr. Markham?) Wilcox-Markham (I1881)
 
146 1850 Census Castor, Stoddard Co, MO list John 36 born in TN, Alexander 16 born in TN, Riley 13 born in TN, Nancy 2 born in MO.
Next door is Stephen Taylor 34 born in TN, Delila 29 born in TN, Susanah 11 born in TN, Elisabeth 9 born in TN, William 7 Born TN, Martha 6 born in TN and John 3 born in MO.

This census information suggests that the Taylors were in MO about 1847 so the birth place of Nancy C in McNairy Co, TN may not be correct.

1860 Census Willow Springs Township, Howell Co, MO lists John 46 born in TN, Mary J 26 born in IL, Adena 8 months born in MO, Luther B 2 born in AR, Martha J 5 born in AR, Nancy J (C) 12 born in MO, Riley J 21 born in TN, Alexander 26 born in TN.

Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas published 1889 Goodspeed Publication PP 248-9

Information probably supplied by Riley J Taylor
"John (Taylor) was a native of West Tennessee. The paternal grandfather a Virginian by birth. John married Sarah Carey, who was born in South Carolina, the maternal grandfather coming originally for South Carolina."
"(Taylor family) Emigrating from Tennessee to what is now Clay Co, Arkansas about 1852 in a wagon drawn by an oxen team, settling on the farm now owned by Robert Hawthorn, in Carpenter Township, where he made improvements and resided until about 1859. Then moving to Howell Co, MO and died there in 1866." "His wife died in Stoddard Co in 1866 on her way to Arkansas." But Sarah was not alive in the 1850 Census of Stoddard CO above. 
Taylor, John (I712)
 
147 1878 was not a leap year so birthdate of 29 Feb 1878 is in question.

Thomas Elishu M’Knight aged 76 years, died on Tuesday January 15, 1929

Thomas Elishu McKnight, oldest son of James and Rebecca McKnight was born in Rockbridge County Virginia, on December 19, 1852, and passed away at the home of his son, James H. McKnight, on January 15, 1929 at the age of 76 years and 27 days.

At the age of five years he moved with his parents to a farm 3 miles south of Memphis.

On February 29, 1878, he was married to Miss Mary P. Montgomery and to their union two sons and one daughter were born: James H., and Samuel P. McKnight and Mrs. Rebecca Frogge, all of whom survive him. His wife passed away on September 21 1888, leaving him with the three little ones. On September 24 1889, he was again married to Miss Eliza A. Montgomery who faithfully helped to raise the children to manhood and womanhood. His wife passed away on December 17, 1913, and since that time he has made his home with his son, James H.

He first united with the Presbyterian Church in Memphis, Missouri, in April, 1876; later he transferred his membership to the Concord Presbyterian Church where he was elected to the Eldership and served as such for many years. Afterwards, he re-united with the Presbyterian Church in Memphis.

He has always lived a consistent Christian life. His faith in the protective love and care of his Redeemer was implicit and endured to the end; even during his last illness he repeatedly expressed his entire willingess that the Lord’s will should be done.

Besides his children he is survived by two grandsons: Orville Lynn Frogge and James Arthur McKnight and one granddaugher Juanita McKnight; two brothers, W.P. and S.W. McKnight; and two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Tippett and Mrs. Anna Smith all of Memphis. Besides the near relatives many others more distant in ties or blood and a host of loyal and devoted friends mourn that removal of a truly good man and upright citizen.

His funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Dr. I. Cochrane Hunt, from the home of his son, James H. McKnight, at 2 o’clock on Thursday afternoon, Jan. 17th, in the presence of a large concourse of relatives, friends and neighbors. The Presbyterian choir sang three favorite hymns of Mr. McKnight. Interment was in the Concord Cemetery. The following acted as pallbearers: Luther Montgomery, Carl Montgomery, Hubert Smith, Jas. Smith, Arlie Tippett, Arthur Tippett. 
MC KNIGHT, THOMAS ELISHU (I664)
 
148 1880 Census Kaufman Co, TX shows her living with brother, Alfred Reese. She was listed as Charlot Norton, age 15, widowed. Also in household was mother Martha, age 44, widowed. Reese, Charlotte Abigail (I3275)
 
149 1880 Kaufman Co, TX Census in house hold of Thomas Muse, grandfather Reese, William (I3710)
 
150 1880 Kaufman Co, TX Census in house hold of Thomas Muse, grandfather Reese, Henry (I3711)
 

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