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Our Reese Family & Many Other Genealogy Pages Jewell Keeling

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Matches 951 to 974 of 974

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951 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of data.

CENSUS: H1790, 1800 Index, 1810 Index, 1820 Index, 1830 Index, 1840 Index. 
SPILMAN, THOMAS JR. (I738)
 
952 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of data.

CENSUS: Have 1820 Index, 1830 Index, 1850.

DEATH: Probate recorded @ Lawrence County, MO (Lucile's Reese notes Nov 29, 1860) 
SPILMAN, JOHN (I752)
 
953 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of data.

CENSUS: Have 1830, 1840 Index, 1850, 1860. 
WOODS, JOSHUA (I681)
 
954 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of data.

CENSUS: Have 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860.
Arrived in Shoal Creek MO in 1842 
MONTGOMERY, SAMUEL (I632)
 
955 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of data.

FGS: Have Family Group Sheets on many of his children.
Lived with grandparents Benjamin Woods Sr.
MARRIAGE: Recorded in Lawrence Co., MO Book ABC, pg 51. This is 14 miles from Bellville, Ill

DEATH: Certificate @ MO Dept of Health, Probate @ Lawrence Co., MO.

CENSUS: Have 1850, 1860, 1880 Soundex.

LINK: Listed parents on death certificate & family knowledge.

MILITARY: In July 1862 enlisted in Confederate Army. Had religious experience on battlefield.
Confederate 11 Regt Missouri Infantry, Private in Company A, Muster Roll Jan&Feb 1864 Enlisted Nov 21 1862 in Vanburen, by Capt Phillips for 3 years. Last paid by Elgui to Aug 31, 1863 Back Suject: Hon. roll General Order Number 64/2 Aug 10, 1864

(Jim Reese notes on picture from Lucile.)
Harris came with parents to MO in 1836.
Confederate soldier no furlough till end under General Sterling Price. Methodist, Apple Orchard, Loved flowers.
Check picture--don't know who Finis is, supposedly a great talker and last survivor. Also who is Bertha? (who live long life)CJR 23-July-2000


Members of the Woods family that have been Residents of what is now Mount Pleasant Township, since long before Lawrence County had a separate existence, came originally from the state of Georgia. Benjamin Woods, the grandfather of the gentleman whose name stands at the head of this sketch, was born in Georgia in 1777 while Georgia was yet one of the thirteen colonies (English), which a few years later became the United States of America. When he was a youth of eighteen he migrated to the then new Territory of Tennessee, and there he later married Elizabeth Winters. These parents had a family of seven children with the good old fashioned names: Joshua, John, Lewis, Benjamin, Ruben, Elizabeth and Polly.

Benjamin Woods moved with this family to Illinois, and lived there for several years, but he evidently had the pioneer instinct in him, for in 1836 he traveled from Illinois into Southwest Missouri and located in what is now Mount Pleasant township, and which at that time was still a part of Barry County.

Mr. Woods was a preacher of the Protestant Methodist Church, one of those men who went to and fro through the scattered pioneer communities, preaching the gospel; burying the dead; marrying the young people; and living a life of self sacrifice and danger that puts to shame many so called preachers of these latter days. Among his other good deeds he selected the location and laid out the Dry Valley Cemetery in 1846. This is in the Southwest part of section 25, in Mount Pleasant Township. Here he was laid to rest in 1852, and his wife was laid by his side in 1858.

The oldest son of this pioneer preacher was Joshua Woods, who was born in Tennessee on the 25th of January, 1796. Boy as he was, he shouldered his musket and fought in the American ranks against England in the war of 1812. When the war was done he returned to Tennessee and when his father moved to Illinois he accompanied him. There in 1820 he was married to Eveline Thomas and became the father of her three children: Marvel L., Louisa, who died at three months of age; and Harris who is the subject of this sketch.

The wife and mother died in 1825 and was laid to rest in Shiloh Cemetery, in St. Clair County, Illinois. In 1831 Joshua Woods married as his second wife, Mrs. Crochee D. (Chewing) Starr, born May 18, 1806. To this marriage were born seven children of whom the only survivor is Joseph Woods, a resident of Mount Pleasant Township: Minerva, Sarah, Eveline, Joseph, Elvira, George, and Emma. Harris Woods being the only one of the first family remaining. Joshua Woods died October 2, 1886, in the ninety-first year of his life. His wife died July 31, 188l. They both sleep in Dry Valley Cemetery.

Harris Woods was born in St. Clair County, Illinois on the seventeenth of September, 1824, a son of Joshua. and Eveline Thomas Woods as stated above. His father moved to Barry, now Lawrence County, and located on 160 acres of government land. That was long before the land had even been laid out into sections by the United States, but when that was done this quarter section became a part of section 25, of Mount Pleasant Township. Eventually Joshua Woods owned over three hundred acres, part of this land was timbered and part prairie. The old pioneer dealt in cattle and fed an average of fifty head or more a year. The land he broke with teams of oxen, frequently having four or five yoke at a time.

His son, Harris received some schooling in St. Clair County, Illinois, and in subscription schools after the family moved to Missouri, but the Woods and Prairies literally swarmed with all sorts of wild game, and the boy spent much more time hunting than at his books. He also did his full part in helping to break the land and bring it into cultivation.

Arriving at maturity he became one of those teamsters who formed the only method of getting the products of this region to market or to bring back the things which could not be procured here. He made several trips to Boonville, Missouri, hauling goods to and from with an ox team. Imagine on our latter days boys starting on such a trip and with such an outfit as that. He also took loads of flour and meat into the Indian Territory, where as he crossed Grand Saline, he traded the articles for a load of salt, which he hauled back to his home settlement. He also put in one year freighting with horses between Sarcoxie and Boonville, and he helped to take two droves of cattle from here to Decatur Illinois. He planned to make a trip to Indiana, but his father was taken ill and he gave it up.

When the Civil War came on Mr. Woods enlisted in 1862, in Company A., Burns Regulars, of Parsons Brigade of the Confederate Army. In this command he served throughout the war. He was offered a lieutenancy, but refused it, saying that he preferred to see it through as a high private. On his return from the army he found in his home a three year old son whom he had never seen.

He had married on February 7, 1850, Arena M. Spilman, a native of Allen County Kentucky, born December 18, 1831. She was a daughter of John and Mary (Polly Boucher) Spilman. Mrs. Woods died on Christmas day, 1894. She was the mother of sixteen children: Marvel L., deceased; Samira E., (Mrs. James Anderson), deceased; Mary Melvina Lynn; Frances H., wife of L.T. Motley, of Mount Pleasant Township; America L., deceased; Wilson H., deceased; Oliver J. of Newton County: Laura L. Mrs. Robert Montgomery of Barry County; Landen P. and Loren D. born July 15, 1861. L.P. resides in Mount Pleasant Township; L.D. in Placerville, Colorado. John E. deceased; Albert T., Placerville, Colorado. Edwin, deceased, Sanford F., Newton County and Rosa May F., Mrs. Charles D. Carver, who resides with her father. She was first married to Jacob R. Bridges, who died in 1896 and has one son living, Walter R. Bridges. She has two children by a second marriage, Carl F. and Raymond Carver.

Mr. Woods first farm was bought in 1851, forty acres in section 28, where he still lives. To this he added later one hundred and twenty acres. From this he gave an acre and a half for a church site, and an acre for a school house. He has always been successful in raising and dealing in all sorts of live stock.

He is a member of the Methodist Church, South, and Stewart many years, and is at present a trustee. He organized the first Sunday School Association in Mount Pleasant Township, and presided at the first township convention held. He was a Sunday School superintendent for five years and township Sunday School president for the same time.


"History of Lawrence County Missouri-1917", pp. 274-277

This is transcribed from a handwritten copy of a letter written by Harris Woods.

State of Ark, April the 5, 1863
Pulaski Co Camp near Little Rock

Dear wife and family I take pleasure in the opportunity of informing of you that I am well and harty at present and I hope those few lines may find you all alive and in good health plenty to eat and wear. Dear father and Mother Brother Sister and relations I hope you are all doing well and are in food spirits. I was sick at vanburen of fever three or four days and then mumps then a hard march to the rock then fever for several days then jaundice. I am able for drill and other duty. I will now inform you of the boys James and Berry Parmley is ded. William Lynn is ded. John Green. John Burnem. James Snow are all ded of your acquaintance. The boys are all fatening up and getting saucey Dec the 27 was the last certan nuse I had from you. A letter wrote to uncle Ben myself and others I would like much to here from you and the children to know how you are getting along arena and what you call your jeb boy Marvel I want you to be a good boy and mind your mother and grandpa Marvel L. was well and harty and about starting to Texas the last I hurd from him I left puss with him he sold her for $100 confed flower is worth one dollar per pound meal 2 dollars per bu hens $3.00 turkeys $7 eggs 2 dollars pr doz potatoes 50 cents per pound sugar 50 cts molasses $5 pr gal fish one dollar per pound biscuit pies ginger bread pound cakes from one to three dollars apiece and plenty and money plenty I have not drawn any money yet I have not suffered for money I have plenty of friends here wee will make adraw on Jef shortly. Father I went and staid with uncle Joel inlow he has three boys and one daughter living one daughter died when I was their he lives 6 miles from little rock among the swamps iff you have any chance to send a letter I want you to do so and let me kno what is going on in the country Wilson Powers is well and harty evy was well and daughter Wilson is at pine bluff below here William Winters and uncle John went to ft smith with a load of tobacco General Sterling Price is with us and has command of the Mo troops Arena I want you to rite the first opportunity you have to send a letter and let me know how you have for along since I left you and how my little match boys are growing how they favor each other and aword from all the rest of the children iff you can send a letter you must back it to Parsons brigade hunters ridgment Co A and let the bearer designate ….(unreadable)…..where the army is

Harris Woods to Arrena Woods and family
Father Mother and all inquiring friends
I remain yours until death

Harris Woods, son of Joshua and Eveline Woods, was born Sept. 17, 1824 in St. Clare County, Illinois, which is about fourteen miles from Bellville. His mother died when he was one year old. He lived with his grandparents Benjamin Woods Sr. and his wife Elizabeth about six years. When his father married Chroch Star. She was a kind and sensible stepmother and my father always loved and respected her. He had one brother Marvel Low Woods Sr.; one sister, America Louise, who died when a few months old; one half brother, Joseph Benjamin; five half sisters; Minerva, Elvira, Sarah Ann, Eveline and Emma; one step sister Elisa Jane Star.

In the year 1836, when he (Harris) was 12 years old, grandfather and family left Illinois and came to Lawrence County Missouri, where they took up land in the Dry Valley Community, some, of which is still occupied by their descendents. Grandfather Joshua Woods was a farmer and fruit grower -- he soon planted apple seed and grafted them and set out orchards. My father, when a young man, also took a great interest in fruit growing.

When a young man, Harris made several trips, in a two horse wagon, hauling produce from Sarcoxie dealers to St. Louis and bringing back a load of goods for the store. On some of these trips he went back of. their old home near Bellville and got seed to plant and twigs to graft to replenish the orchard. He told me that on one of these visits he got pear seed from which those large old pear trees which grew in Grandpa's yard were grown. Apple trees were scarce at the time and they would often ride several miles to get seed or twigs to plant or graft. (Remember there were no nurseries, no catalogs, no railroads, few post offices, and very meager postal service in the country at that time.)

When father left to join the army he left a fine young orchard on the farm with mother and I'll never forget the large red June trees which we children delighted to climb and pluck the fine red apples first hand. After he returned after the war he established a commercial nursery and for several years supplied the neighbors and surrounding community with hundreds of trees.

He loved flowers too and was always interested in the old fashioned flower garden which was planted every year somewhere about the yard. After he became old his love for flowers increased and he spent: much of his time cultivating and admiring them.

Harris Woods and Arrena Spillman were married February 7, 1850. They first moved into Grandfather Woods' old log house near the old spring where they lived until the fall of 1854 when they moved into the house in which they spent the rest of their lives. This house is now occupied by their youngest daughter, Rose May and Charley Carver. It is situated about eight miles east of Sarcoxie and about seven miles northwest of Pierce City, Missouri. It has housed four generations of the Woods family and is still a very comfortable residence. My father hauled the lumber of which it was made from Boonville, Missouri. It was all rough and the carpenters dressed all the ceiling with a hand plane. They used one whole summer and early fall building the large one and half story house. It was among the first if not the first frame dwelling houses erected in that part of the country.

To Harris and Arrena were born sixteen children: Marvel; Samira Eveline; Mary Melvina; Frances Henry; America Louise; Wilson Harley; Oliver Joshua; Laura Lenora; Landen Price and Loren Davis (twins); John Emmett; Ellis Porter; Albert Thomas; Edwin Armstrong; Sanford Finis; and Rosa May Florence. All lived to be grown except Emett who died in 1872 at the age of eight years and nine months.

When the Civil War came on Harris took the part of the South and in July of 1862 joined the regular army enlisting in Company A, Parsons Brigade, Burns Regiment under General Sterling Price. He was in many battles, was never wounded and never returned home until peace was made in 1865. When he laid down his gun, he laid down his prejudice and grudges if he ever had any and taught his family to do likewise. So he fought for what he thought was right and was never ashamed of it. All of his children have been proud to say that, "my father was a southern soldier."

Great was the joy when he returned home and great was the task of getting things together so as to make a living which only those who lived at the strenuous time can ever understand -- they toiled and struggled for many years and God blessed their effort as he always does those who work uprightly.

Among other things he did, him and Eddy Motley got their tools together went into the woods, cut trees and made old fashioned sorghum mills, one apiece and several for the neighbors. At this time sugar was a luxury which only a few could afford, and molasses was stored by the barrel in most all the country homes and used plentifully.

At the time a furnace was made out in the open and about four large kettles fitted into it and in these the juice of the cane was boiled down into molasses or sorghum.

Harris was happily converted to the Christian faith while attending a revival in the army and after returning home united with the Dry Valley Methodist Church South. He served the Church as Steward, Class Leader, Sunday School Superintendent., Property Trustee, and was always willing to do his part to support the church financially. In 1893 when the Dry Valley Church was built, he donated the lot and land enough for a churchyard He was a great S. S. worker and when the Union S. S. Workers of Lawrence County undertook to get the county enrolled as a banner county of the State, he was elected President of Mt. Pleasant Township and by his untiring efforts for several years succeeded in getting it up to all requirements.

He was always a friend to education and served many years on the school board and always took a liberal part in anything that was for the good the community, and when a new school house was to be built in 1876 he donated the land on which it was built and now stands.

Oliver tells me that Pa told him, not many years before he died that he helped to organize the old Dry Valley School District. The house, a very good frame building was built for church and school by donation, sometime between 1845 and 1850. There may have been some select schools taught in it. In 1853 when our present Public School system was inaugurated, it was turned over to the district and the school maintained by taxation. It was in the edge of Lawrence County, but took in territory in Newton, and Jasper Counties. It took considerable time to collect the taxes from the different counties, but stood the ravages of the War and within its walls hundreds of children were educated who went out into the world and made good citizens. While it was used for a church, Methodist Church South, many were converted to the Christian Religion, but most all have passed on to their rewards ere this is written.

When about 70 yrs. old he was a great walker and did not care to be bothered with a horse and buggy, but delighted to walk to Wentworth, a distance of about four miles and get the mail for his own and fifteen other families. He provided himself with a mailbag and went every Tuesday and Friday, taking letters to be mailed--the neighbors depended on him especially in busy seasons. By and by this got to be quite a task for my mother to look after so much mail in the house. She suggested that a box be put up outside the front gate and all mail of the neighbors left in it. This was done and it is likely the first Rural Free Delivery mail box put up in the State of Missouri. It was used until it was superseded by our present rural route system of April 1, 1903.

In the home was kind and even tempered and liberal with what means he had. He liked for his friends to visit him and had a lot of visitors. He always enjoyed a good joke if it was not injurious to anyone. As a neighbor he was peaceable and accommodating and, strictly honest. I am certain that he never tried to. cheat anyone out of penny in all his long life.

I can say about him as I did about my mother that he may have had his faults but his virtues so far outnumbered them that they were very obscure.

He died October 17, 1916. His funeral was preached by an old friend Rev. Markie Robb, at the Dry Valley Church on Sunday October 19 in the presence of many relatives and friends.

He was aged 91 years and 19 days.

Written by Mrs. Lenora Montgomery .
(typed copy of April 4, 1940 by rec)

(Handwritten comment by VLR Died of cancer of the mouth, no doubt caused by smoking a pipe for many years. Age 92 when he died.) 
WOODS, Oliver Harris (I692)
 
956 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: LUCILE REESE is descendent & contributed most of the data.

CENSUS: Have 1810, 1830, 1840.

PARENTS: The 1810 census lists him as "Jr.", therefore his father's name is JAMES MONTGOMERY also.
Published (by whom ?) Genealogy notes from Carl Montgomery
James and Elizabeth (Lowery) Montgomery
James Montgomery came to East Tennessee from Abingdon area in Washington County, VA. He was married to Elizabeth Lower on May 9, 1797, and first settled in Roane County. The exact date that he came to Tennessee is not known, but he owned land in Roane County in 1806 (portion that became Rhea County in 1807). His tract was situated north of Old Washington in the area now known as Clear Creek.

James was a large land holder in the COunty. Records show that he purchased land from Fredrick A. Ross in 1818 (part of the 2300 acre Long Reach Tract) and Richard G. Waterhouse in 1825. He also received a Grant of 250 acres from the State of Tennessee in 1828. It is estimated that his property totaled around 600 acres (approximately 160 acres are still owned by his descendants).

One acre of the property purchased from R.G. Waterhouse was set aside as a burying ground and was named the Montgomery Cemetery, where James aqnd his wife, Elizabeth, were later burried.

Two of James' sons, Robert C. and James A., were co-administers of his esate after his death in 1844. His personal estate, including nine Negro slaves (excluding real estate), was valued at $803.00. 
MONTGOMERY, JAMES (I626)
 
957 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: Most of following data is from a book by John Jasper Spilman.

Name originally was BOUSHELDER, but it was changed by a lawyer making land deeds.

Apprenticed at the age of 5 to a millwright. Lived 7 years in Loudoun Co. VA. Moved to SW PA settled on Monohgahela River (near where Pittsburg now stands) until 1784. Moved to Kentucky by flatboat via Monongahela and Ohio Rivers landing at Louisville. Settled in Mercer Co., KY.
MILITARY: In the Battle of Blue Licks (Aug 19, 1782) where the Indians killed almost all of the whites, he had his horse killed from under him, but he managed to escape by bounding upon a horse behind a soldier who was passing by.

Oct 2, 1793 he bought about 4000 acres of land in what was then Warren Co., KY, but which was later (some time after 1810 census) put into Allen Co. Settle was the post office in the early 1900's. Name was chaged to Boucher at the date of this land purchase. He got these via military claims as a Revolutionary Soldier. North of Barren River.
Ref: John Jasper Spilman History via Euphrates Boucher.

DEATH: In his olden years he became senile, and while living with his son Peter, Jr., he ran away & managed to evade friends until he was 30 miles from home in another county. There he was accidentally shot by a young man who picked up an old gun which went off & to the surprise of all, killed the old man.

HONORS: He came to Kentucky with Daniel Boone on his 2nd or 3rd trip. 
BOUCHER, PETER SR. (I779)
 
958 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: NOMA KEELING & STRATTON TARVIN are descendants & contributed most of
the data.

CENSUS: Have 1830, 1850, 1860. 
KEELING, WILLIAM (I569)
 
959 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: NOMA KEELING & STRATTON TARVIN are descendents & contributed most of
the data.

CENSUS: Have 1830, 1850.

MARRIAGE: Found @ Lewis Co, TN courthouse.

DEATH: Have picture of tombstone.

LINK: On Dad's 1850 census.
1920 Census same page as Francis Jewell Keeling 
KEELING, GEORGE (I571)
 
960 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: NOMA KEELING is descendent & contributed most of data.

FGS: Have FGS & Death Certificate.
1910 a dn 1920 Census (Joseph A Keeling) shows Andrew B Keeling next to Joseph A Keeling 
KEELING, ANDREW BROWN (I590)
 
961 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: STRATTON TARVIN is descendent & contributed most of data along with
NOMA KEELING.

FGS: Have several FGS.
1930 Census suggests a Sarah A Keeling as wife with daughter Lorene, 24, and son, Eugene, 19. Samuel is show born in TN about 1870 ? 
KEELING, SAMUEL ALEXANDER (I591)
 
962 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: This is GRANDMA KEELING!

DEATH: Have Certificate & Obit.

RELIGION: Active in Circle One Club of Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 
MONTGOMERY, ALVA GRACE (I603)
 
963 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

RELATIVE: This is GRANDPA KEELING!

MARRIAGE: Have copy of License.

DEATH: Have copy of Certificate & Obit.

PARENTS: Mother died when he was very young, so he was raised by his
Grandparents, GEORGE & LOUISA KEELING.

HONORS: Owned several restaurants in Springfield.

RELIGION: Elder of the First Presbyterian Church in Springfield.

1930 Census shows Troy, Edna and JT living with Arthur and Alva. Also Joseph Keeling 
KEELING, ARTHUR (I600)
 
964 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

She was a Mongoloid - a good helper, but with little ability. 
WOODS, AMERICA LOUISA (I707)
 
965 [Data furnished by Velma Lucile Montgomery and June Ann Reese.FTW]

Wrote a book about the Spilman family. 
SPILMAN, NATHAN COSBY (I764)
 
966 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

"imported in the ship Christian, Captain Thomas Brady, from Rotterdam but last from Cowes, England," and took the oath on Wed 13 Sep 1749 
Goodnight, Christian (I2077)
 
967 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

"Ship Recovery, Amos Jones, Master, from Rotterdam and Cowes," brought "Gerrick Goodnight" who took the oaths on Oct 23, 1754

See Hans Michael Goodnight notes for the beginning of this account by HS Goodnight.

Goodnight, Gerick (I2078)
 
968 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

A Revolution soldier 
Doran, Patrick (I2033)
 
969 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

Elizabeth was a sister of James McMurry who married Mary "Polly" Goodnight in 1810. 
McMurry, Elizabeth (I2074)
 
970 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

lived from 1789 on near Stanford, KY

See Hans Michael Goodnight for the beginning of this account.

JACOB GOODNIGHT

If, as we have been informed, Michael Goodnight married Mary Landers in February of 1762, and if, as we may reasonably assume, the daughters Margaret and Elizabeth were their oldest children, it follows that the four sons, John,
Jacob, Henry and Abraham, were born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, for Michael Goodnight bought his farm there in 1784. Asbury ascertained from John's family Bible that John was born May 2, 2765; the second son, Jacob appears as "over 21" in a Lincoln County tax list in 1780. Probably, then, Jacob was born about 1767. This is merely inferential guessing, however; the exact date of his birth seems to be unknown.

If 1787 is, perchance, the correct date, then Jacob was a little chap of about eight when the Revolution broke out; he was perhaps ten or eleven years old when the family migrated to Kentucky; and he was probably not over fourteen when his father was killed in 1781.

There is no record of military service as an enlisted man on the part of Jacob Goodnight, so far as we know. The years of his young manhood fell between our two wars with England. He was presumably about sixteen when the treaty of Paris was signed, ending the Revolutionary War, and he was forty-five at least at the outbreak of the War of 1812, in which his eldest son, John, served as a private. In all probability, however, Jacob Goodnight saw his share of the Indian fighting which engrossed all pioneer Kentuckians intermittently up to the time of Wayne's successful campaign and his treaty with the western Indians in 1795.

We have little actual knowledge, however, of Jacob Goodnight's boyhood and of the years of his youth. Presumably, he remained with his mother and brothers on the family homestead, near the present Perryville, until he broke the home ties and set out for himself. The home was originally in Lincoln County, but in 1785, Mercer County was formed from Lincoln, and the Goodnight farm was included in the new county. Mary Flannagan (Michael Goodnight's widow and Jacob's mother), John Goodnight, Henry Goodnight and Abraham Goodnight are all listed on the tax rolls of Mercer County in its early years. Jacob, however, seems to have struck out for himself and to have made his headquarters near Stanford at an early date. His name does not appear in the Mercer County tax lists at all, but it, appears consistently in the Lincoln County lists from May 30, 1789, on. At this time he was presumably about twenty-two, and he is designated as a "single male, over 21" and owing one horse. Each year, his tax is recorded as a small amount until 1786, when it is considerably increased. In that year he is taxed on "100 acres originally surveyed for James Craig."

In his family Bible (2) we find the statement that he married Elizabeth Hoover on March 15, 1792. Unhappily, no trace of the marriage bond has been found, and we know neither the place of the marriage nor the home or family of the bride.

On March 25, 1794, Christian Goodnight and Caterinah, his wife, of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, gave Jacob a clearance of title to 187 acres of land in Mercer County, evidently his inheritance from the estate of Michael.

Goodnight to Goodnight.

This Indenture made this 25th day of March in the year of our herd one thousand seven hundred and ninety four between Christian Goodnight of Maclingburg North Carolina and Jacob Goodnight of the County of Mercer the other part.

Witniseth that the said Christian Goodnight and Caterinah his wife for & in Consideration of the sum of five shillings to them in hand paid current money by the said Jacob Goodnight the receipt when of the said Christian Goodnight & Caterinah his wife do hereby Acknowledge: Have Granted bargained and sold and by these presents do sell alow & confirm unto the said Jacob Goodnight and his heirs forever, one certain tract of Land containing one hundred and sixty seven acres lying & being in the. County of Mercer on Chaplin's fork and hounded as follows. Towit (long description omitted) — a part of a survey made for Michael Goodnight. with its appurtenances to have & to hold forever to his the said Jacob Goodnight and his heirs proper use & the said Christian Goodnight & his wife for themselves & their heirs the said tract of land with its appurtenances to the said Jacob Goodnight & his heirs will warrant & forever defend against the claim of him the said Christian Goodnight & Caterinah his wire & his heirs forever and against the claim of no other person. In Witness whereof the said Christian Goodnight & Caterinah his wife by John Goodnight their attorney in fact have hereunto set their hands & seals the day & year written.

Sealed in presence of John Goodnight (Seal),
And Delivered Ws Christian Goodnight &
Caterinah his wife (Seal).

Three years later, however, on January 24, 1797, Jacob and Elizabeth, his wife, deeded the 167 acres on Chaplin's Fork to Charles Hart and his heirs (4). They had evidently made their permanent abode in Lincoln County.

They appear to have added from time to time to their Lincoln County land, consisting, at first, it would seem, of the above-mentioned "100 acres originally surveyed for James Craig," on which they began to pay taxes in 1796.

On January 6, 1801, Jacob bought 8 acres on the Hanging Fork of Dick's River from Hugh Leeper and Martha, his wife, for £21 (5).

On August 11, 1802, he acquired 94 acres, also on Hanging Fork, from William Nash for £100 (6).

And on July 30, 1823, he purchased six and three quarter acres on Hanging Fork from James Hardin, for $49 (7). His farm thus included something over 200 acres.

On this farm, located about 3 miles west of Stanford, Jacob and Elizabeth Goodnight lived and died. All their children were born and reared there. The latter scattered, however, the sons migrating westward, for the most part, and the daughters following their husbands, So far as the writer has been able to ascertain, the widow and foster-son of Thomas M. Goodnight, a grandson of Jacob through his on Isaac, are the only members of the family remaining in the vicinity, and they are not descendants of Jacob.

An abstract of a will of James Isom, of record in Boyle County, adjacent to Lincoln, written September 9, 1842, and probated in January, 1843, shows Jacob Goodnight named as executor (8).

Jacob Goodnight died on February 19, 1848. If our assumption regarding the date of this birth is approximately correct, be was about seventy-six at the time of his death. His wife had preceded him in death by twenty-three years. His will, which is on file in the Lincoln County Court House, runs thus:

WILL OF JACOB GOODNIGHT

I Jacob Goodnight of Lincoln County Kentucky make and ordain this my last will and testament hereby revoking all others.

Item 1st. It is my Will and desire that all my just debts must be paid out of my Estate.

Item Second. It is my will and desire that my eon John Goodnight receive the sum of Two hundred Dollars out of my Estate and that my Executor pay my said Son John Goodnight the said sum of Two hundred dollars In convenient time after my decease.

Item Third. It is my will and desire that my daughter Polly McMurry receive the Sum of One Dollar from my Estate, and that my daughter Sally Harney receive the Sum of One Dollar from my Estate, and that my Son Isaac Goodnight receive the Sum of One Dollar from my Estate, and that my daughter Peggy P(orch) receive the Sum of One Dollar from my Estate, and that my Grand(son) James P. Goodnight and that my Grand
daughter Mary Goodnight, children of my deceased Son Henry Goodnight, it is my will and desire that my aforesaid Grand children receive the Sum of One Dollar each from my Estate and that my Grandson Thomas Henry Billingsley Son of my deceased daughter Elizabeth Billingsley. It is my will and desire that my Said Grandson receive the Sum of One Dollar from my Estate, the above mentioned sums of money being the full and entire amount that I Want My Children and Grandchildren before named to receive from my Estate.

Item 4th. It is my Will and desire that my son Thomas Goodnight receive all the remaining part of my estate after the payment of my just debts and the sums of money previously directed to be paid my children mentioned and set forth at large in. the previous part of this Will.

Item 5th, I do hereby ordain and appoint my son Thomas Goodnight Executor of my Last will and Testament Signed and delivered this 23 day of November,

Jacob Goodnight.
Attest :
J, M. Smith
T. Kenley
John P. Steels
State of Kentucky
Lincoln County

At a County Court holden for the County of Lincoln at the Court house in the town of Stanford an Monday the first day of April 1843 the Last Will and Testament of Jacob Goodnight dead was executed into court and was proven by the oaths at John D. Steel and Jeremiah Smith two of the subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

And on the motion of Thomas Goodnight who made oath as the Law directs and executed bond in the penalty of Five Thousand Dollars unto Hugh Logan Hays his security with a proper condition. Ordered that a certificate be granted him for obtaining a probate of Said Will and in due form of Law In Testimony Whereof I Thomas Helm, Clerk of the Lincoln County Court have hereinto subscribed my name, the day and year aforesaid.

Thomas Helm, Clerk
Lincoln County Court.


It is a peculiar will; all heirs except John and Thomas are cut off with one dollar. John, the eldest on (grandfather of the present writer) had married and removed to the vicinity of Bloomington, Indiana, in 1827, sixteen years be-fore the execution of the will. Thomas was the youngest son, and from the fact that he is named executor as well as heir to all the property, he had doubtless remained on the home farm and taken care of his father in his old age. Henry is referred to in the will, as deceased, but one wonders why Isaac shared the late of his sisters and the grandchildren and received only one dollar.

It all happened nearly a century ago, and probably no one now living can answer our questions. Presumably the provisions of the will were carried out, and we find no record of any attempt to set it aside.

We are fortunate in having the family Bible of Jacob Goodnight preserved. It was carried to Missouri by Thomas Goodnight, when he pioneered into the West nearly a century ago, and is still in the possession of his descendants. The following items are from photostatic copies of the family record contained in it:


MARRIAGES
Jacob Goodnight and Elizabeth Hoover were married March 15th day 1792 --.
James McMurry &PolIy Goodnight was married Dec.1810.
John Goodnight & Rhode Brown was married Oct. 19th, 1820.
John Goodnight & Agnes Jones was married December 22nd 1825.
Elizabeth Goodnight & John Billinsley was married Feb. 13th 1831.
Henry Goodnight & Louisa Jane Billingsley was married December 2nd, 1830.
Margaret Goodnight & John Henry Porch eves married March 11th 1834.
Thomas Goodnight and Martha Dawson was married the 23rd July 1885.
Elijah W. Dawson & Martha Bosley was married December the 16th 1840.


BIRTHS
Polly Goodnight was born December 30th 1702.
John Goodnight was born May 4th 1794.
Elizabeth Goodnight was born Nov. 15th. 1795.
Sarah Goodnight was born August 25th 1797.
Henry Goodnight was born Feb. 16 -- 1800.
Isaac Goodnight was born March 20th 1802.
Thomas Goodnight was born Oct. 25th 1805.
Margaret Goodnight was born Jan, 22nd 1808.

DEATHS
Elizabeth Goodnight departed this Life April1st 1820.
Rhode Goodnight departed this life Sept.11th 1823.
Jacob Goodnight departed this life Feb.19 1843.
Thomas Goodnight departed this life Oct.13th 1851. 
Goodnight, Jacob (I2025)
 
971 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

Spent his life in Mercer Co. KY 
Goodnight, John (I2024)
 
972 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

Will probated 1840, in Lincoln Co. The data relating to Jacob's family are fomr the will and from his family Bible, now in possession of Gilbert Goodnight, Know Noster, MO (Ca 1936)

See Hans Michael Goodnight for the beginning of this story

JOHN GOODNIGHT

Like his father, he was a pioneer farmer. He was the second child and the eldest son born to Jacob and Elizabeth Hoover Goodnight, May 4, 1794, on their farm three miles west of Stanford in Lincoln County, Kentucky. We know nothing of his childhood, 'but it was presumably the life of toil and adventure that was the lot of frontiersmen's sons in that early day. Probably the most colorful part of his career was his service as a soldier under General Jackson in the War of 1812. He fought as a youth of 20 at the battle of New Orleans, January 8,1815, among the Kentucky riflemen who served so well on that occasion. His service record, supplied by the Adjutant General's Office at Washington under date of April 6,1923, reads in part:

"The records of this office show that John Goodnight served in the War of 1812 as a private in Captain Jonathan Owsley's Company, 15th Regiment (Slaughter's) Kentucky Militia. His service commenced November 10,1814, and ended May 10, 1815. His name appears on a muster roll, dated Camp Jackson, December 31, 1814 and on a company master roll dated Camp Jackson, Louisiana., February 28, 1815."

His six-month period of service ended, then, within a week after he passed his 21st birthday.

The battle of New Orleans was a remarkable one in two respects: First, because it was fought after peace bad been signed in Europe, ending the struggle, but the contestants had not yet received the news; and, second, because of the frightful slaughter of the English with a mere handful of casualties on the American side.

"In that brief space of time (about one hour) one of the best equipped, and best disciplined armies England ever sent forth was defeated and shattered beyond hope by one half its number of American soldiers, mostly militia."(1)

Slaughter's regiment of Kentucky militia, in which John Goodnight was serving as a private, appears to have been in the thickest of the fighting, as the following extracts from Smith's history show.

"With Colonel Slaughter's regiment of seven hundred men and Major Reuben Harrison's battalion, three hundred and five men (the Kentuckians under arms), Adair took position just in the rear of Carroll's Tennesseans, occupying the center of the breastwork line."(2)

"As soon in the morning as word came that the British were in motion for an advance, General Adair formed his Kentuckians in two lines in close order and marched them to within fifty paces of the breastwork in the rear of Carroll's command, The day dawned and the fog slowly lifted. There was no longer doubt of the point of main assault, as the enemy's heaviest columns moved forward in Carroll's front. The lines of the Kentucky troops were at once moved up in order of close column to the Tennesseans, deepening the ranks to five or six men for several hundred yards. Batteries 6, 7 and 8 opened upon the enemy when within four or five hundred yards, killing and wounding many, but causing no disorder in his ranks nor check to his advance. As he approached in range, the terrible fire of rifles and musketry opened upon him from the Tennessee and Kentucky infantry, each line firing and' falling back to reload, giving place to the next line to advance and fire."(3)

"On our left, in front of the Tennesseans and Kentuckians, the greatest execution had been done. The slaughter here was appalling. Within a space three hundred yards wide, and extending out two hundred yards from our breastwork on the battlefield, an area, of about ten acres, the ground was literally covered with the dead and desperately wounded … There lay before him [viz., an English officer who surveyed the field during the truce] in this small compass not less than one thousand men, dead or disabled, all in the uniform of the British soldier; not one American among the number.''(4)

In an appendix to Smith's volume, there is a roster of each company of the American army participating in the battle. John Goodnight's name appears on page 190 as a private in Captain Jonathan Oswley’s Company of the regiment commanded by Colonel Gabriel Slaughter.

After his discharge front the army, John Goodnight appears to have returned to Kentucky, and he presumably spent the next few years as a dutiful eldest son should, aiding his father in tilling the paternal acreage. We find no further record of him until October 18, 1820, when he was married to Rhoda Brown.

After her death in 1823, he again married. This second marriage, to Agnes Jones, is recorded in Lincoln County archives, the bondsman being Joseph Whorton., and the date being December 21, 1825.

Two years later, responding, perhaps, to the pioneering urge he had inherited from his fathers, he turned his bade upon. Kentucky and set his face northward.

In those days, veterans received recognition of their war service in. the form of a grant of land, instead of cash or a pension. The quarter Section of land thus awarded to John Goodnight lies near the present city of Bloomington, Indiana. Its description is

Part of Section Section Township Range
E ½ S. W. 8 8N 1 W 80 acres
W ½ S. W. 8 8N 1 W 80 acres

In 1827, the farm was probably from two to three miles from the village, and not far from the present site of Clear Creek. Today, the city has gone out to meet the farm and the latter is now in its very outskirts. The Dixie Highway passes directly by it.

To this farm John Goodnight and his second wife Agues came in the year of 1827, bringing Margaret, the sole surviving child of the first marriage, and Elizabeth A., their own first born. They remained there twenty-five years, and it was there that the remaining children were born, Mary Jane, Martha Ellen Amanda F., Thomas Henry and Frances M.

Again, however, the wanderlust cast, its well upon the old pioneer, and in 1852, then 58 years of age, John Goodnight sold his farm, loaded his family and belongings into a great wagon and migrated farther north and west in search of cheaper land. Nine years before, his father, Jacob Goodnight, had passed away in Kentucky, and John's store of earthly goods had doubtless been augmented by the bequest of $200 stipulated in his father's will. John appears, however, never to have accumulated much wealth.

The writer has often heard his father, Thomas Henry, who was a lad of 12 at the time of the migration, tell of the hardships of the overland trek into western Illinois in 1852, of the prolonged delay at Terre Haute, waiting for the high waters of the Wabash to subside, so they might cross in safety, and of the settlement on the new home land, in. Henderson County, Illinois. The farm was a tract of 160 acres lying one mile east of Old Bedford Church. When asked why John hadn't taken a farm in the rich prairie land nearby, instead of a timbered piece broken by runs and gullies, Thomas used to reply that his father John thought the prairie land worthless, except for pasturage; that the heavy sod could never be successfully broken,

The land records also show that on Jan. 27, 1860, John Goodnight bought the N. W. quarter of the N. W. quarter of Section. 5, Town 7 N., Range 4 W. (Blandinsville Township), of George H. Payne for $750. On June 12, 1868, he sold four acres of this forty to the Trustees. of the Christian Church at Old Bedford for $90, and on the same day, eight and one half acres to Hugh W. Hodgen for $240. John Goodnight had come from the Bedford limestone region. His Indiana farm is within a mile of immense present day quarries of Bedford stone. He sold to the Trustees of the Church the land for the edifice, and, apparently, at a reduced price—probably his contribution to the undertaking. One wonders whether he may have suggested the name which the church has borne ever since.

The family had resided nine years in the new home in Illinois when the Civil War broke out. Thomas Henry, born in 1840, was just 21. John, however, was 67, and his children, with the sole exception of Thomas Henry, were all girls. The only son was undoubtedly needed on the farm and his father was insistent that he remain. Whether John's war experience in youth had given him pacifistic leanings, whether his Kentucky rearing and his strong Democratic convictions had made him less loyal to the cause of the North than his neighbors, or whether the exigencies of the family farm situation in 1861 were alone responsible, the writer cannot say, but John was determined that his son should not go to war. Thomas Henry yielded to the importunities of his father, and remained at home, although, he himself had been strongly inclined to volunteer. John paid $500 for his son's exemption from the draft.

As old age drew on him, John became more and more dependent upon Thomas Henry. In response to his insistence, the latter gave up missionary work in Kansas in 1875 and returned to Blandinsville in order to be with his aging parent who had moved into town, although the unmarried daughters, Amanda and Ellen, were keeping house for him in exemplary fashion. Thomas Henry remained in Blandinsville until after his father's death. The present writer remembers his grandfather John who used to take him walking, aged 4 years, up and down the main street of the small town, passing banter with all and sundry.

John was buried in the Old Bedford cemetery and his wife Agnes, who had preceded him in death by five years, sleeps beside him. Their epitaphs read:

"John Goodnight
Died
June 28, 1879
Aged
85 yrs. 1m. 24d."
________________________

"Agnes Good Goodnight
Departed
December 15, 1874
Aged
74 years."

The dates in these inscriptions differ by a few days from those contained in the following biographical sketch from a county history (5). Although the differences are unimportant, the dates on the stones are doubtless correct. Eighty-five years, one month and twenty-four days from May 4, 1794, brings us to June 28, 1879, and not June 25th. In general, however, the sketch is accurate as to factual data, and, as the book is now rare, the page is here reproduced.
John Goodnight (deceased) was born in Stanford, Lincoln county, Kentucky, on May 4, 1704. He was a soldier under Gen, Jackson at New Orleans during the years 1814-5. He was married to Rhoda Brown October 18, 1820. She died in 1823, and he was married a second time to Agnes Jones. December 22, 1825. She died December 13, 1874, leaving him once more alone. Monroe County lived the greater part of his time for twenty-five years. Under the eldership of Michael Combs he embraced the doctrine of the Christian church in 1833. He removed to Adams county in the fall of 1852, and early in the spring of 1853 removed to a farm one mile east of Bedford church in Henderson county, and from there to Blandinsville in the spring of 1876, where he died at the age of eighty-five years, one month and twenty-four days, he was an exemplary Christian, and as a man he was honest in all his dealings, ever ready to denounce evil on its first appearance; the poor never left his door uncared for; the hungry were bountifully supplied from his table, and the naked were clothed by his generous hand. He died June 25, 1879. By his first marriage with Miss Rhoda Brown he had two children: Isaac, born July 3, 1821; Sarah M., August 19, 1822. Isaac died in infancy, and Sarah married Samuel A. Moore February 12, 1846. Agnes Jones, his second wife, was born in 1800. They were married December 22, 1825. The following children were born to them; Elizabeth A. born October 16, 1826; Mary J., April 14, 1831; Martha E. February 26, 1834; Amanda F., April 24, 1836; Thomas H, December 8, 1840; Francis M., January 12, 1845.


-- MERGED NOTE ------------

[GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW]

Will probated 1840, in Lincoln Co. The data relating to Jacob's family are fomr the will and from his family Bible, now in possession of Gilbert Goodnight, Know Noster, MO (Ca 1936)

See Hans Michael Goodnight for the beginning of this story

JOHN GOODNIGHT

Like his father, he was a pioneer farmer. He was the second child and the eldest son born to Jacob and Elizabeth Hoover Goodnight, May 4, 1794, on their farm three miles west of Stanford in Lincoln County, Kentucky. We know nothing of his childhood, 'but it was presumably the life of toil and adventure that was the lot of frontiersmen's sons in that early day. Probably the most colorful part of his career was his service as a soldier under General Jackson in the War of 1812. He fought as a youth of 20 at the battle of New Orleans, January 8,1815, among the Kentucky riflemen who served so well on that occasion. His service record, supplied by the Adjutant General's Office at Washington under date of April 6,1923, reads in part:

"The records of this office show that John Goodnight served in the War of 1812 as a private in Captain Jonathan Owsley's Company, 15th Regiment (Slaughter's) Kentucky Militia. His service commenced November 10,1814, and ended May 10, 1815. His name appears on a muster roll, dated Camp Jackson, December 31, 1814 and on a company master roll dated Camp Jackson, Louisiana., February 28, 1815."

His six-month period of service ended, then, within a week after he passed his 21st birthday.

The battle of New Orleans was a remarkable one in two respects: First, because it was fought after peace bad been signed in Europe, ending the struggle, but the contestants had not yet received the news; and, second, because of the frightful slaughter of the English with a mere handful of casualties on the American side.

"In that brief space of time (about one hour) one of the best equipped, and best disciplined armies England ever sent forth was defeated and shattered beyond hope by one half its number of American soldiers, mostly militia."(1)

Slaughter's regiment of Kentucky militia, in which John Goodnight was serving as a private, appears to have been in the thickest of the fighting, as the following extracts from Smith's history show.

"With Colonel Slaughter's regiment of seven hundred men and Major Reuben Harrison's battalion, three hundred and five men (the Kentuckians under arms), Adair took position just in the rear of Carroll's Tennesseans, occupying the center of the breastwork line."(2)

"As soon in the morning as word came that the British were in motion for an advance, General Adair formed his Kentuckians in two lines in close order and marched them to within fifty paces of the breastwork in the rear of Carroll's command, The day dawned and the fog slowly lifted. There was no longer doubt of the point of main assault, as the enemy's heaviest columns moved forward in Carroll's front. The lines of the Kentucky troops were at once moved up in order of close column to the Tennesseans, deepening the ranks to five or six men for several hundred yards. Batteries 6, 7 and 8 opened upon the enemy when within four or five hundred yards, killing and wounding many, but causing no disorder in his ranks nor check to his advance. As he approached in range, the terrible fire of rifles and musketry opened upon him from the Tennessee and Kentucky infantry, each line firing and' falling back to reload, giving place to the next line to advance and fire."(3)

"On our left, in front of the Tennesseans and Kentuckians, the greatest execution had been done. The slaughter here was appalling. Within a space three hundred yards wide, and extending out two hundred yards from our breastwork on the battlefield, an area, of about ten acres, the ground was literally covered with the dead and desperately wounded … There lay before him [viz., an English officer who surveyed the field during the truce] in this small compass not less than one thousand men, dead or disabled, all in the uniform of the British soldier; not one American among the number.''(4)

In an appendix to Smith's volume, there is a roster of each company of the American army participating in the battle. John Goodnight's name appears on page 190 as a private in Captain Jonathan Oswley’s Company of the regiment commanded by Colonel Gabriel Slaughter.

After his discharge front the army, John Goodnight appears to have returned to Kentucky, and he presumably spent the next few years as a dutiful eldest son should, aiding his father in tilling the paternal acreage. We find no further record of him until October 18, 1820, when he was married to Rhoda Brown.

After her death in 1823, he again married. This second marriage, to Agnes Jones, is recorded in Lincoln County archives, the bondsman being Joseph Whorton., and the date being December 21, 1825.

Two years later, responding, perhaps, to the pioneering urge he had inherited from his fathers, he turned his bade upon. Kentucky and set his face northward.

In those days, veterans received recognition of their war service in. the form of a grant of land, instead of cash or a pension. The quarter Section of land thus awarded to John Goodnight lies near the present city of Bloomington, Indiana. Its description is

Part of Section Section Township Range
E ½ S. W. 8 8N 1 W 80 acres
W ½ S. W. 8 8N 1 W 80 acres

In 1827, the farm was probably from two to three miles from the village, and not far from the present site of Clear Creek. Today, the city has gone out to meet the farm and the latter is now in its very outskirts. The Dixie Highway passes directly by it.

To this farm John Goodnight and his second wife Agues came in the year of 1827, bringing Margaret, the sole surviving child of the first marriage, and Elizabeth A., their own first born. They remained there twenty-five years, and it was there that the remaining children were born, Mary Jane, Martha Ellen Amanda F., Thomas Henry and Frances M.

Again, however, the wanderlust cast, its well upon the old pioneer, and in 1852, then 58 years of age, John Goodnight sold his farm, loaded his family and belongings into a great wagon and migrated farther north and west in search of cheaper land. Nine years before, his father, Jacob Goodnight, had passed away in Kentucky, and John's store of earthly goods had doubtless been augmented by the bequest of $200 stipulated in his father's will. John appears, however, never to have accumulated much wealth.

The writer has often heard his father, Thomas Henry, who was a lad of 12 at the time of the migration, tell of the hardships of the overland trek into western Illinois in 1852, of the prolonged delay at Terre Haute, waiting for the high waters of the Wabash to subside, so they might cross in safety, and of the settlement on the new home land, in. Henderson County, Illinois. The farm was a tract of 160 acres lying one mile east of Old Bedford Church. When asked why John hadn't taken a farm in the rich prairie land nearby, instead of a timbered piece broken by runs and gullies, Thomas used to reply that his father John thought the prairie land worthless, except for pasturage; that the heavy sod could never be successfully broken,

The land records also show that on Jan. 27, 1860, John Goodnight bought the N. W. quarter of the N. W. quarter of Section. 5, Town 7 N., Range 4 W. (Blandinsville Township), of George H. Payne for $750. On June 12, 1868, he sold four acres of this forty to the Trustees. of the Christian Church at Old Bedford for $90, and on the same day, eight and one half acres to Hugh W. Hodgen for $240. John Goodnight had come from the Bedford limestone region. His Indiana farm is within a mile of immense present day quarries of Bedford stone. He sold to the Trustees of the Church the land for the edifice, and, apparently, at a reduced price—probably his contribution to the undertaking. One wonders whether he may have suggested the name which the church has borne ever since.

The family had resided nine years in the new home in Illinois when the Civil War broke out. Thomas Henry, born in 1840, was just 21. John, however, was 67, and his children, with the sole exception of Thomas Henry, were all girls. The only son was undoubtedly needed on the farm and his father was insistent that he remain. Whether John's war experience in youth had given him pacifistic leanings, whether his Kentucky rearing and his strong Democratic convictions had made him less loyal to the cause of the North than his neighbors, or whether the exigencies of the family farm situation in 1861 were alone responsible, the writer cannot say, but John was determined that his son should not go to war. Thomas Henry yielded to the importunities of his father, and remained at home, although, he himself had been strongly inclined to volunteer. John paid $500 for his son's exemption from the draft.

As old age drew on him, John became more and more dependent upon Thomas Henry. In response to his insistence, the latter gave up missionary work in Kansas in 1875 and returned to Blandinsville in order to be with his aging parent who had moved into town, although the unmarried daughters, Amanda and Ellen, were keeping house for him in exemplary fashion. Thomas Henry remained in Blandinsville until after his father's death. The present writer remembers his grandfather John who used to take him walking, aged 4 years, up and down the main street of the small town, passing banter with all and sundry.

John was buried in the Old Bedford cemetery and his wife Agnes, who had preceded him in death by five years, sleeps beside him. Their epitaphs read:

"John Goodnight
Died
June 28, 1879
Aged
85 yrs. 1m. 24d."
________________________

"Agnes Good Goodnight
Departed
December 15, 1874
Aged
74 years."

The dates in these inscriptions differ by a few days from those contained in the following biographical sketch from a county history (5). Although the differences are unimportant, the dates on the stones are doubtless correct. Eighty-five years, one month and twenty-four days from May 4, 1794, brings us to June 28, 1879, and not June 25th. In general, however, the sketch is accurate as to factual data, and, as the book is now rare, the page is here reproduced.
John Goodnight (deceased) was born in Stanford, Lincoln county, Kentucky, on May 4, 1704. He was a soldier under Gen, Jackson at New Orleans during the years 1814-5. He was married to Rhoda Brown October 18, 1820. She died in 1823, and he was married a second time to Agnes Jones. December 22, 1825. She died December 13, 1874, leaving him once more alone. Monroe County lived the greater part of his time for twenty-five years. Under the eldership of Michael Combs he embraced the doctrine of the Christian church in 1833. He removed to Adams county in the fall of 1852, and early in the spring of 1853 removed to a farm one mile east of Bedford church in Henderson county, and from there to Blandinsville in the spring of 1876, where he died at the age of eighty-five years, one month and twenty-four days, he was an exemplary Christian, and as a man he was honest in all his dealings, ever ready to denounce evil on its first appearance; the poor never left his door uncared for; the hungry were bountifully supplied from his table, and the naked were clothed by his generous hand. He died June 25, 1879. By his first marriage with Miss Rhoda Brown he had two children: Isaac, born July 3, 1821; Sarah M., August 19, 1822. Isaac died in infancy, and Sarah married Samuel A. Moore February 12, 1846. Agnes Jones, his second wife, was born in 1800. They were married December 22, 1825. The following children were born to them; Elizabeth A. born October 16, 1826; Mary J., April 14, 1831; Martha E. February 26, 1834; Amanda F., April 24, 1836; Thomas H, December 8, 1840; Francis M., January 12, 1845. 
Goodnight, John (I2038)
 
973 [GoodnightKyFamilies.FTW] Billingsley, John (I2042)
 
974 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. REESE, K.D. (I2662)
 

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